UC Berkeley History of Art Department

People / Graduate Students

Current Students

    • Joseph Albanese

    • Bio

      Joseph Albanese (2018) studies fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Northern European art. Joseph has an interest in exploring the relationship between art of that period and performance as well as early sixteenth-century print culture. Joseph graduated with his double BA in Art History, History, and Spanish Literature from the George Washington University in 2017 and MA in Early Northern European Art from The Courtauld Institute of Art in 2018, where he wrote about depicting gender and supernatural identities in woodcuts from early editions of La Celestina. 

    • Mathilde Andrews

    • Bio

      Mathilde Andrews (2017) studies nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American art. Her research interests include the history of science as it pertains to gender and race, and the picturing of these debates in visual culture. She received her BA in History of Art and French from UC Berkeley in 2016, and her MA from The Courtauld Institute of Art, London in 2017.  

    • Jess Bailey

    • Bio

      Jess Genevieve Bailey is a PhD candidate studying Northern European medieval art and completing a concurrent degree in medieval studies. Her dissertation is supervised by Professors Beate Fricke (Universität Bern) and Elizabeth Honig (UC Berkeley). Her dissertation is about war and gender in medieval European manuscripts and turn of the 16th century works on paper. Her research engages the history of medicine, military technology, disability studies, and feminist critical theory. Jess is interested in the drawn horizons of bodily difference and the lines which divide, mark, and marginalise bodies in pictorial space. She studies violence, desire, and the abject; vagrants, doctors, and soldiers turned itinerant artists. Jess holds a B.A. in Art History from the University of California at Berkeley, where she studied 12th century Japanese Buddhist sculpture. She has taught for the Prison University Project in San Quentin State Prison and organised the inaugural Berkeley / Stanford symposium on migration and displacement in the arts at The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

    • Randip Bakshi

    • Bio

      Randip studies early modern art with a particular emphasis on Mughal art and architecture. He received a B.A. from the University of Toronto and an M.A. from the University of Victoria. At Victoria, he helped establish the graduate student journal, ARTicuate. His other interests include popular culture and gender & sexuality, especially queer cultures in modern South Asia. 

    • Alexandra Courtois de Vicose

    • Bio

      Alexandra Courtois (2009) studies 19th century French art. Her interests encompass a variety of media, (including painting, drawing, printing processes and photography, all relevant to her dissertation research on Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec), as well as Disability Studies, proving to be a productive framework to analyze Lautrec's oeuvre and life in a new light.

    • Sarah Cowan

    • Bio

      Sarah Louise Cowan specializes in modern and contemporary art of the Americas. Her dissertation, “Mending Abstraction: Howardena Pindell’s Non-Representational Black Feminisms, 1967 – 1986,” the first comprehensive study of the multimedia work of visual artist Howardena Pindell, examines the changing relationships between race, gender, and modernisms in the United States in the wake of 1960s liberation movements. More broadly, Sarah's research concerns black feminist art histories, cross-cultural theories of modernism and abstraction, and histories of photography. She earned a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2011 and an M.A. in 2015.

    • Matthew Culler

    • Bio

      Matthew Culler (2009) studies early modern art with a particular interest in Italian art and art theory.  He received a B.A. from Kenyon College and an M.A. from the University of North Carolina in 2007.

    • Michele D'Aurizio

    • Bio

      Michele D’Aurizio (2018) studies modern and contemporary art, with a focus on postwar Italy. His primary research interests include the cross-over between art and design (interior and furniture design and craft arts), the relationship between industry, technology, and art, and the political philosophy of Autonomism. He holds an MFA in Visual Arts and Curatorial Studies from the Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti in Milan. Between 2014 and 2018, he worked as the editor of the contemporary art magazine Flash Art. In 2016, he co-curated the 16th Quadriennale d’Arte in Rome. 

    • Ramon De Santiago

    • Bio

      Ramón de Santiago researches the trans-Pacific transfer of visual and material culture between South Asia and Latin America in the Early Modern period, with a particular interest in pre-colonial systems of trade in both regions. His theoretical interests include questions of historiography in trans-oceanic systems and visual and material practices. His current project uses multidisciplinary methods to investigate the layers of exchange of objects, goods, and people through world oceanic systems. 

    • Karine Douplitzky

    • Bio

      Karine Douplitzky (2011) was born and raised in France and recently moved to the Bay Area. She has a non-typical profile: a Master's degree in Engineering and an M.A. in Film Studies, followed by many years as a documentary film director. One of her favorite subjects is the History of Paper: she wrote a book on the topic, as well as several articles on related themes such as the power of media. She then spent a year in Japan teaching French literature and cinema. Karine studies under Professor Elizabeth Honig. She is particularly interested in Dutch and Flemish art and hopes to continue research on the question of the Smile. She has eclectic interests, including photography, elaborating themed exhibits and restoring a 12th-century prieuré in France.

    • Thadeus Dowad

    • Bio

      Thadeus Dowad (2014) specializes in the art and architectural history of Europe and the Ottoman Empire in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a special interest in global methods of analysis that address the latent Orientalist residues of art historical research today. Thadeus’ dissertation will examine the first wave of experimentations with “Western” image genres and media on the part of the Ottoman government during an era of heightened reform known as the New Order (1789-1839). His study argues for an integration of Late Ottoman art history into a broader narrative of globalizing image forms that accompanied the expansion of French and British empires in the nineteenth century. Thadeus currently resides in Istanbul, where he is completing his first year of dissertation research as a Paul Mellon Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA).

    • Susan Eberhard

    • Bio

      Susan Eberhard is a 4th year, researching the histories of objects, art and architecture in the global 19th and 20th centuries, particularly in China and the US. Her theoretical interests include questions of value and exchange, material practices, race, and social realisms, using methods drawn from economic, social and political history, visual culture studies, history of design, and cultural anthropology. Her dissertation project examines the circulation of silver as coin, commodity, and crafted object through the Chinese port city of Guangzhou/Canton in the 19th century. She received her BA in art history and critical theory at Swarthmore College.

    • Ellen C. Feiss

    • Bio

      E. C. Feiss (2015) is a critic and PhD candidate studying the history and theory of Modern and Contemporary art, specifically western socially and politically engaged art practices that articulate programs for justice and social utility. She also writes broadly about art after 1960.  Her work has appeared in Afterall, Frieze, Open! Radical Philosophy and Texte zur Kunst amongst others. In 2014–15, she was a resident at the Jan van Eyck Academie, Maastricht and an instructor at the Sandberg Instituut, Amsterdam. She holds an MA from Goldsmiths College, University of London and a BA from Smith College. She also works here.  

    • Jessica Flores García

    • Bio

      Jessica "Jez" Flores García (2012) is a PhD candidate studying contemporary art with a particular interest in Chicano art. She is writing her dissertation on the role of various types of camp, via queer culture, rasquache, and glam rock, in the eclectic artistic production of the East Los Angeles art collective Asco. After completing her MA at the University of Cincinnati, she served as curator for contemporary art at the Cincinnati Art Museum and acted as assistant to the creative director for the 11th Venice Biennale of Architecture. Jez earned her BFA from Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia.

    • Carl Gellert

    • Bio

      Carl is spending 2013-14 on a Japan Foundation Fellowship in Nara, Japan. While there he will be conducting research for his dissertation at the Nara National Institute for Cultural Properties and Archaeological Institute of Kashihara. His dissertation examines the Fujinoki tomb, focusing on an examination of grave-goods and other artifacts from the site as a means of better understanding 5th-8th century mortuary traditions, and Japan’s early relationship with China and Korea.

    • Lesdi Goussen

    • Bio

      Lesdi Goussen (2017) studies mid-20th century Latin American art in a transatlantic context, focusing on the exchanges taking place between Latin America, Europe, and the United States. Framed within this context, her work primarily looks at the development and dissemination of Central American aesthetics from the 1950s through the aftermath of the Central American crisis in the 1990s, a time marked by armed conflict, US intervention, and revolutionary struggle within several countries. Working alongside a range of fields, Lesdi's research interests include women of color feminisms, Latinx studies, postcolonial theory and decoloniality. Lesdi holds a B.A in Art History from New York University.

    • Andrew Griebeler

    • Bio

      Andrew Griebeler (2010) studies medieval and Byzantine art with Diliana Angelova and Beate Fricke. Andrew graduated with a B.A. in art history and biology at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington. Andrew’s research interests include manuscripts, spolia, and medieval science and image theory.

    • Stephanie Hohlios

    • Bio

      As an art historian of twentieth-century Japan, Stephanie Hohlios’s research focuses on the visual and material culture of performance. Her dissertation (forthcoming), titled "Obuje on the Move: Performance, Mobility, and Social Engagement in 1960s and 1970s Japan," explores the intersection of theater and artistic exhibition practice, specifically a turn in the 1960s and 1970s toward traveling experimental events. Stephanie spent the 2017 - 2018 academic year doing language study and independent research at the Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama, Japan. In 2018 - 2019 she will be conducting dissertation research in the U.S. and Japan.

    • Claire Ittner

    • Bio

      Claire Ittner studies twentieth-century modernisms, with an emphasis on the arts of America and the African diaspora. Her research interests include the spaces of creation and display, race and national identity, questions of influence, and archival theory and practice. She earned a B.A. from Davidson College in 2013. 

    • Riad Kherdeen

    • Bio

       Riad Kherdeen (2016) studies global modern art and architecture, with a focus on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. His interests include comparative and alternative modernisms, postcolonial and critical theory, modes of abstraction, the built environment, cross-cultural exchange, intermateriality, and technical art history. Riad holds a B.A. in Art History and a minor in Chemistry from New York University (2013) and an M.A. in the History of Art and Archaeology from the Institute of Fine Arts (2016). His M.A. thesis “Masdar City: Oriental City of the Twenty-First Century,” advised by Jean-Louis Cohen, looks at the urban design and architecture of Masdar City in the United Arab Emirates as a new iteration of the “Orientalized” city within a genealogy of recent urbanism in the Arab world, one that still succumbs to the imagined representations of the region created by European imperialism yet embraces those stereotypes to construct new narratives about its people and its nascent nation.

    • Kristen Kido

    • Bio

      Kristen Kido (2014) specializes in comparativism,  cultural heritage and the law, with a particular emphasis on ancient art in the contemporary world. Her dissertation focuses on the intersection between the cultural and legal matrices generated and encountered by the so-called "Goddess of Morgantina," from the time of its making to its contemporary repatriation to Sicily. Having received her M.A. in Comparative Art an Archaeology from University College London, Kristen is interested in cross-cultural and comparative issues in art history, and her research is rooted in contemporary athropological and sociological theory. Kristen advanced to candidacy in Spring 2017, and will continue dissertation work while completing her J.D. at University of California, Irvine, School of Law.

    • Grace Kuipers

    • Bio

      Grace Kuipers studies 20th century American art. She is particularly interested in theories of display and collecting, as well as concepts of citizenship. She earned her B.A. from Wesleyan University in 2014. She interned in Washington, D.C. at the National Gallery of Art’s Department of Photographs before spending 2015-2016 in Berlin, Germany on a fellowship supported by the Fulbright commission. 

    • Rosaline Kyo

    • Bio

      Rosaline is a PhD candidate specializing in 20th century Chinese and Tibetan art. Her dissertation focuses on visual cultures and the codification of body standards and behavior as it pertains to the process of nation building in 20th century China. She examines specific visual propaganda projects and their intersection with contemporaneous political campaigns and practices of image production. She has conducted research for extended periods of time in Nepal, China and the Tibetan Autonomous Region with support from the History of Art Department and the Institution of East Asian Studies.

    • Rebecca Levitan

    • Bio

      Rebecca Levitan studies the art and architecture of the ancient Mediterranean world. She received her B.A. in Art History from Emory University and her M.Litt in Ancient History from the University of St Andrews. She has excavated in Belgium, Greece, and Italy. Her research interests include polychromy, numismatics, and the reception of antiquity in Europe and the United States.  

    • Mary Lewine

    • Bio

      Mary Lewine works on objects deposited into Buddhist statues in East Asia, with a particular focus on stamped and printed replications of Buddha images. She is interested in conceptions of sacred presence, iconicity, ontologies of the relic, and the poetics of the hidden. Her research explores transregional circulations of knowledge and material culture through Buddhist networks; the agency of the seal; and iconographic development. Her dissertation focuses on a particular category of statue deposit prevalent among the deposit assemblages of 13th and 14th century statues from Kansai region statuary workshops and religious contexts, inbutsu kechien kyōmyō. She received her BA in Chinese at Vassar College and an MA at UC Berkeley in the Group of Asian Studies prior to joining the department.

    • Andrea Jung-An Liu

    • Bio

      Andrea Jung-An Liu (2018) studies Modern East Asian Art, with a focus on the artistic productions across the Japanese Empire. She takes a special interest in tracing the trans-national and trans-medial history of Japanese modern art while interrogating the formation of art historiography and art criticism in the first half of the twentieth century. She is also interested in critical and postcolonial theory, the politics of display, and the relationship between war, propaganda and art. Before moving to Berkeley for her PhD studies, she interned at MoMA in NYC and worked for the Museums Association in Taiwan. She received her Mst. in art history and visual culture from the University of Oxford, where she wrote her Mst. thesis on the art of Foujita Tsuguharu to discuss the limits of self-orientalization and the historical construction of the East-West binary which in many ways contested with the promise of universalism in the dominant discourse of modern art.  

    • Daniel Marcus

    • Bio

      Daniel Marcus is currenlty working at Oberlin College and previously was a visiting scholar in the History of Art Department at the University of Pennsylvania at the invitation of Professor Kaja Silverman. He is working on a dissertation titled The Banality of Speed: Automotive Modernity in Interwar France, which investigates artistic responses to the vulgarization of the automobile. Alongside his dissertation work, he has written regularly on contemporary art and politics, contributing a catalogue essay to the Boston ICA’s upcoming survey of artist Amy Sillman, a reply to October’s questionnaire on Occupy Wall Street (with Jaleh Mansoor and Daniel Spaulding), and numerous exhibition reviews to Artforum and Art in America. For the coming year, he has accepted a position as Teaching Fellow in the Histories of Art, Media, and Design at the Pasadena Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles.

    • Elizabeth McFadden

    • Bio

      Elizabeth McFadden specializes in early modern fashion and dress. She is writing a dissertation on fur clothing in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England and Holland. In the past she has interned at The Museum at FIT and the V&A. She earned her MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London where she was recently a Kress Fellow. She currently resides in Paris.

    • Verónica Muñoz-Nájar

    • Bio

      Verónica Muñoz-Nájar studies colonial Latin American art with a focus on the visual and material culture of the Viceroyalty of Peru. Her interests include the transatlantic circulation of objects, the biopolitics of colonial tropicalism during the Bourbon era, and early modern print culture. Verónica’s dissertation explores the understudied visual culture of the lower Amazon basin under missionary and governmental dominion during the eighteenth century. She is particularly interested in the unorthodox measures of control that were implemented in the region in accordance with European Enlightenment initiatives, resulting from decades of social rebellions, such as the use of art (primarily drawing) as a strategy to reinforce civility in the Amazon communities. In 2018, Verónica became the Mellon Curatorial Intern in Latin American Art at the Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru. Previously, she was the Thoma Visiting Scholar in Spanish Colonial Art at the Blanton Museum and the Research Assistant at the Los Angeles County Museum, where she assisted in the production of Painted in Mexico, 1700-1790: Pinxit Mexici. Verónica holds an M.A. from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University as well as a B.A. in History of Art from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.

    • Angela Pastorelli-Sosa

    • Bio

      Angela (2018) studies modern and contemporary Latinx and Latin American printmaking and paper communities. Her research focuses on post-war artist networks that explore the conceptual underpinnings of paper to engage in transnational dialogues about liberation, history, and identity. She received her BA in Art History from Williams College in 2016, and subsequently spent a year in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Drawings and Prints department before going on to work at Rosenberg & Co. art gallery in New York.  

    • Ariana Pemberton

    • Bio

      Building upon and expanding her undergraduate studies of South Asian Art History at UC Berkeley, where she received her BA from the Department in 2017, Ariana Pemberton (2018) works on the subcontinent in relation to the Indian Ocean littoral (emphasizing the Arabian Sea) during the Medieval period. Her interests focus on medieval globalization, cosmopolitanism, and long-distance exchange. Her transcontinental approach of bringing South Asia, the Persian Gulf, and East Africa into the same conversation, aims to challenge misconceptions and progress the previous, more traditional, and segregated scholarship of the areas.  

    • Yessica Liliana Porras

    • Bio

      Yessica Porras (2015) is a first-year PhD student focusing on Colonial Latin American art. After years away from her native country of Colombia, she developed an interest in art history as a way of learning more about her culture and expanding the knowledge of this understudied area. She is looking forward to beginning her work under the guidance of Todd Olson and Lisa Trever. She graduated from UC Berkeley in 2014. Here she developed an interest in the intersection between colonial and indigenous cultures,
      represented in in her Honors Thesis Church of St. John the Baptist at Sutatausa: Indoctrination and Resistance.
       

    • Sasha Rossman

    • Bio

      Sasha grew up in Berkeley and Switzerland. He left the Bay Area in the late 90s to study art history and art practice on the East Coast and in Germany, where he worked in contemporary art for many years and also studied at Berlin's Freie and Humboldt Universities. He then returned to Berkeley to study art, architecture, film, philosophy, critical theory and literary theory across numerous departments- focusing on constructions of space, temporality and history across media.

    • Miriam Said

    • Bio

      Miriam Said (2011) earned her B.A. in art history from Syracuse University in 2009, and focuses on art of the ancient near east and the early Greek period. Her research interests include art of the first millennium with a focus on near eastern cultural cross-roads and interaction with the Eastern Mediterranean world; ritual and religion, and the representation and function of hybrid beings in art. She is also particularly interested in issues of cultural heritage and repatriation, which she hopes to explore in more depth in the coming years. Miriam most recently hails from New York where she spent the last two years working at both The Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art.

    • Sandra Sardjono

    • Bio

      Sandra Sardjono (2009) studies the art and visual culture of Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on Indonesia. She is currently writing a dissertation on the depictions of textiles in Java from the Hindu-Buddhist period, 8th-15th century. She spent the last couple of years conducting research in the Netherlands as Visiting Scholar in the Leiden Institute for Area Studies, Leiden University. She earned her B.A. from Bowdoin College in Maine and an M.A. from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She served as Textile Conservator at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York and as Assistant Curator of Costume and Textiles at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

      Co-advisors: Joanna Williams and Marijke Klokke (Leiden University)

       

    • Andrew Sears

    • Bio

      Andrew Sears (2012) studies medieval art and architecture with Beate Fricke. He received his B.A. in Art History from Emory University. His research focuses on relics, reliquaries, and saints' cults, with a particular emphasis on Northern Europe and the Hanseatic League.

    • Ryan James Serpa

    • Bio

      Ryan Serpa (2018) studies twentieth century art of the United States, specifically art of California and the non-continental U.S. He is interested in color, the politics of space, critical race theory, regionalism, and ecology as they pertain to problems of painting and the depiction of land. His research focuses on mid-century art of the San Francisco Bay Area and he has written on Bay Area Figurative painting. Ryan received his B.A. in the History of Art from UC Berkeley in 2017. 

    • Emma Silverman

    • Bio

      Emma Silverman specializes in Modern and Contemporary American art with a designated emphasis in Women, Gender and Sexuality. Emma is writing her dissertation on the Watts Towers in Los Angeles. More broadly, her research is concerned with art's role in the built environment, the visual cultures of social movements, and the politics of folk and outsider art. Emma earned her BA from Wesleyan University in 2006 and graduated with an MA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2012.

    • Delphine Sims

    • Bio

      Delphine Sims studies the history of photography in the Americas. She earned a B.A. in Art History and African American Studies from the University of Southern California in 2013. Her research focuses on the ways in which race, gender, geography, and urbanity inform landscape photography. She previously worked at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art as the Curatorial Assistant in the Department of Photography. There, she organized exhibitions and contributed writings on subjects such as the history of salted paper prints, California landscape photography, mid-20th-century Mexican photography, and contemporary American photography.  

    • Jon Soriano

    • Bio

      Jon Soriano (2012) studies the arts of East and Central Asia, with a particular interest in Buddhist concepts of space and script during the Qing Dynasty. Jon has an MA in Asian studies from CSULB and an MA in ethnology from Cheng-Chi University, and has worked as a researcher at the National Palace Museum in Taipei and as a Chinese-to-English translator. Jon is currently the recipient of a Eugene Cota-Robles fellowship. A recent work appears in the journal Room 1000.

    • Jessica Stair

    • Bio

       

      Jessica is a PhD candidate focusing on the art of Colonial Latin America with a designated emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies. She is co-advised by Todd Olson and Lisa Trever. Jessica is currently conducting research on her dissertation, Textual-Pictorial Literacies in the Techialoyan Manuscripts of New Spain, which examines the relationship between text and image in a corpus of seventeenth-century indigenous manuscripts from Central Mexico. She is particularly interested in the ways in which images played a crucial role in the formation of autochthonous history and identity at a time when alphabetic script had almost completely supplanted the picture in indigenous records. Jessica also serves as a co-organizer for the Townsend Center for the Humanities Working Group: Latin American Art and Literature Working Group. 

       

       

       

    • Shivani Sud

    • Bio

      Shivani Sud (2013) studies the art and visual cultures of South Asia, with a particular focus on the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. She received a B.A. in Art History from UCLA in 2012. Broadly, her areas of interest include colonial studies and postcolonial criticism, object and collecting histories, and Indian cinema. Shivani is currently working on her qualifying paper on colonial epidemiological photography.

    • Joel Thielen

    • Bio

      Joel Thielen (2016) studies Japanese Buddhist art. His interest centers on how Zen images reflect their specific contexts, including specific theological ideas, monastic contexts, and national traditions. He is also interested in how Zen practices shift as they move from one country to another—from Japan to the West. Joel received his BA from Colorado College in 2011. 

    • Ty Vanover

    • Bio

      Ty Vanover (2017) studies 19th- and early 20th-century art, specializing in German and Austro-Hungarian visual culture and theories of gender and sexuality. His primary research centers on the intersection of sexology, visuality, and artistic production. He is particularly interested in the visual mapping of sex drives and erotic behaviors within sexual-scientific discourse. It is from this vantage point that his current work reconsiders image production, reception, and circulation between 1890 and 1933, with an emphasis on paintings, book illustrations, photographs, and films produced concomitantly with—and in response to—emergent sexual research and theory. Ty received his BA in Art History from the University of Virginia and his MA in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London.

    • Patricia Yu

    • Bio

      Patricia J. Yu is a doctoral candidate studying Chinese art with Professor Patricia Berger. Her dissertation addresses the Qing imperial garden of the Yuanming Yuan (Garden of Perfect Brightness) and the way in which its ruins and looted objects have been reproduced, reinterpreted, and reconstructed in modern and contemporary China. Her research interests also include Qing court art, art in cross-cultural translation, and issues of cultural heritage and preservation. She was a pre-doctoral fellow at the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, under the scholar theme "Iconoclasm and Vandalism" in 2017–2018. She is currently the Mellon Graduate Curatorial Intern in the Asian export art department at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem Massachusetts (Fall 2018).