Events

Archive

5:00 pm | 5/3/2021 | Live on Zoom | Until 7:00 pm | 5/3/2021

Roundtable with John López (Art History, UC Davis), Kristopher Kersey (History of Art, UCLA), Swati Chattopadhyay (History of Art and Architecture, UC Santa Barbara), Ivy Mills (History of Art, UC Berkeley)

Register here.

 

What will art history look like in the wake of 2020? How must our work as historians of art change in order to meet the compounding pressures of a global pandemic, an escalating climate crisis, and widespread civil unrest? How do we build an art history that looks beyond the discipline’s current horizons—that is expansive, sustainable, and ethical?

Departures, Deviations, Detours is a series of conversations meant to address these urgent and timely questions. Departing from the traditional lecture format, we invite open dialogue with scholars, artists, and activists whose work challenges normative assumptions in the disciplines of art history and visual cultural studies to expand our thinking and open new avenues for critical discussion. In staging these welcome interventions into the field, we hope to build from the present crises a more equitable domain for collaborative study.

May 3rd, 5 PM PST: Roundtable with John López (Art History, UC Davis), Kristopher Kersey (History of Art, UCLA), Swati Chattopadhyay (History of Art and Architecture, UC Santa Barbara), Ivy Mills (History of Art, UC Berkeley) 

Co-sponsored by the Asian Art and Visual Cultures... [show more]


4:30 pm | 4/16/2021 | Live on Zoom | Until 6:30 pm | 4/16/2021

Fumi Okiji (Rhetoric, UC Berkeley) and Andrew Jones (East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley)

Register here.

 

What will art history look like in the wake of 2020? How must our work as historians of art change in order to meet the compounding pressures of a global pandemic, an escalating climate crisis, and widespread civil unrest? How do we build an art history that looks beyond the discipline’s current horizons—that is expansive, sustainable, and ethical?

Departures, Deviations, Detours is a series of conversations meant to address these urgent and timely questions. Departing from the traditional lecture format, we invite open dialogue with scholars, artists, and activists whose work challenges normative assumptions in the disciplines of art history and visual cultural studies to expand our thinking and open new avenues for critical discussion. In staging these welcome interventions into the field, we hope to build from the present crises a more equitable domain for collaborative study.

April 16th, 4:30 PM PST: Fumi Okiji (Rhetoric, UC Berkeley) and Andrew Jones (East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley)

Supported by the Stoddard Fund in the History of Art Department, U.C. Berkeley


6:30 pm | 3/29/2021 | Live on Zoom | Until 8:30 pm | 3/29/2021

Vishal Jugdeo (Department of Art, UCLA) and Nicole Miller (Department of Visual Arts, UC San Diego)

Register here.

 

What will art history look like in the wake of 2020? How must our work as historians of art change in order to meet the compounding pressures of a global pandemic, an escalating climate crisis, and widespread civil unrest? How do we build an art history that looks beyond the discipline’s current horizons—that is expansive, sustainable, and ethical?

Departures, Deviations, Detours is a series of conversations meant to address these urgent and timely questions. Departing from the traditional lecture format, we invite open dialogue with scholars, artists, and activists whose work challenges normative assumptions in the disciplines of art history and visual cultural studies to expand our thinking and open new avenues for critical discussion. In staging these welcome interventions into the field, we hope to build from the present crises a more equitable domain for collaborative study.

March 29th, 6:30 PM PST: Vishal Jugdeo (Department of Art, UCLA) and Nicole Miller (Department of Visual Arts, UC San Diego) with Kavena Hambria (MFA, Art Practice) and Tausif Noor (PhD Student, History of Art).

Supported by the Stoddard Fund in the History of Art Department,... [show more]


4:00 pm | 3/12/2021 | Live on Zoom | Until 6:00 pm | 3/12/2021

Bridget R. Cooks (African American Studies and Art History, University of California, Irvine) and Jennifer A. González (History of Art and Visual Culture, University of California, Santa Cruz) moderated by Julie Rodrigues Widholm (Director, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive)

Register here.

 

What will art history look like in the wake of 2020? How must our work as historians of art change in order to meet the compounding pressures of a global pandemic, an escalating climate crisis, and widespread civil unrest? How do we build an art history that looks beyond the discipline’s current horizons—that is expansive, sustainable, and ethical?

Departures, Deviations, Detours is a series of conversations meant to address these urgent and timely questions. Departing from the traditional lecture format, we invite open dialogue with scholars, artists, and activists whose work challenges normative assumptions in the disciplines of art history and visual cultural studies to expand our thinking and open new avenues for critical discussion. In staging these welcome interventions into the field, we hope to build from the present crises a more equitable domain for collaborative study.

March 12th, 4:00 PM PST: Bridget R. Cooks (African American Studies and Art History, University of California, Irvine) and Jennifer A. González (History of Art and Visual Culture, University of California, Santa Cruz)

Moderated by Julie Rodrigues Widholm (Director, Berkeley A... [show more]


4:30 pm | 2/26/2021 | Live on Zoom | Until 6:30 pm | 2/26/2021

K. Wayne Yang (Ethnic Studies, UC San Diego) and Carolyn Jean Martin (Art History, Berkeley City College)

Register here.

 

What will art history look like in the wake of 2020? How must our work as historians of art change in order to meet the compounding pressures of a global pandemic, an escalating climate crisis, and widespread civil unrest? How do we build an art history that looks beyond the discipline’s current horizons—that is expansive, sustainable, and ethical?

Departures, Deviations, Detours is a series of conversations meant to address these urgent and timely questions. Departing from the traditional lecture format, we invite open dialogue with scholars, artists, and activists whose work challenges normative assumptions in the disciplines of art history and visual cultural studies to expand our thinking and open new avenues for critical discussion. In staging these welcome interventions into the field, we hope to build from the present crises a more equitable domain for collaborative study.

February 26th, 4:30 PM PST: K. Wayne Yang (Ethnic Studies, UC San Diego) and Carolyn Jean Martin (Art History, Berkeley City College)

Supported by the Stoddard Fund in the History of Art Department, U.C. Berkeley


2:00 pm | 12/7/2020 | Live on Zoom | Until 4:00 pm | 12/7/2020

Dr. Carolyn Smith (Karuk), Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow University of California, Berkeley

Register here.

Through stories of the lived experiences of three, early 20th century northwestern Native California women, this paper reveals the inextricable strength that ties belongings to families, histories, and tribal nations. Reading archival materials and museum collections through a Karuk way of knowing, the stories that arise complicate narratives of the alienability of Native American belongings. This paper takes a holistic research practice grounded in indigenous methodologies, illuminating how Native Californian belongings encompass knowledge beyond the tangible object. It speaks of the world of past and present, endeavoring into an indigenous futurity.

Carolyn Smith (Karuk) is the Da’luk Program Coordinator for the Northern California Indian Development Council, and recently served as the interim Executive Director for the California Indian Basketweavers Association. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from UC Berkeley and is a basketweaver and artist. In exploring Indigenous ontological understandings of baskets and their roles, her research addresses how baskets are intertwined with ways of knowing and being in the world. Most recently, she and a group of ... [show more]


10:00 am | 12/4/2020 | Live on Zoom | Until 12:00 pm | 12/4/2020

Justin Underhill

Digital photographs are the dominant medium of the twenty-first century. Yet, the indexical quality of the photograph–the trace of an encounter between an illuminated surface and an image sensor–is increasingly compromised by technologies capable of generating fraudulent or misleading images. The artifice of these pictures is often undetectable to the naked eye. This workshop will introduce students to some of the tools used to analyze forgery and image manipulation (such as the tools used in Photoshop, Facetune, etc). 

No prior coding/image processing/graphic design experience needed; all are welcome.

Register here

Registration will close at 12pm PST on December 3.


4:00 pm | 11/12/2020 | Live on Youtube | Until 5:30 pm | 10/21/2020

Julia Bryan-Wilson and Olivia Ardui in conversation with Thomas Lax

This talk will take place on ARC’s YouTube channel, here.

From pre-Columbian ceramics, to abstract early 20th century canvases inspired by rhythms, to contemporary activist choreography, Histories of Dance illuminates the potential of dance to express physical joy and desire—and also collective anger—in the face of oppression and crisis. By looking at how bodies move together within specific political, historical, and economic contexts, the exhibition reflects how dance functions as exuberant resistance. It emphasizes self-invention and the assertive claiming of territories of Black and indigenous people moving together in space. In addition, Histories of Dance foregrounds the contribution of women, with special attention to feminist and queer work, Chilean women mourning the disappeared under Pinochet with la cueca sola, and research around pioneering female dancers, such as Josephine Baker and Analívia Cordeiro.

To mark the Histories of Dance catalog publication, join ARC for a conversation about the show with Julia Bryan-Wilson and MASP Curator Olivia Ardui. Julia and Olivia will be in conversation with Thomas Lax (Curator of Media and Performance, MoMA).


Thomas J... [show more]


4:00 pm | 10/29/2020 | Live on Zoom | Until 5:00 pm | 10/29/2020

W. J. T. Mitchell, Gaylord Donnelley Distinguished Service Professor, The University of Chicago

“Present Tense 2020: An Iconology of the Epoch” is an essay written in the present tense about a tense moment in human history. Instead of asking the classic philosophical question, “what is time?” it switches our attention from ontology to iconology, asking what pictures metaphors, and narratives capture our sense of the mood of the times in which we live, and our larger pictures of time as such. The image repertoire of the essay thus includes iconic moments and figures from current events, but it is grounded (anachronistically) in the three basic figures of temporality provided by Greek mythology: Chronos (linear, clock time); Aeon (Cyclical time); Kairos (the opportune or critical moment of decision), all linked to the dynamic concept of Parousia, the sense that something is coming, and that we inhabit an epoch of unprecedented intensity in human history. Special emphasis will be placed on time-scales, from the split second of police decision-making to the “deep time” of climate change and species extinction, as well as the “affective temporality” of a historical epoch when these scales collapse and the times are routinely described in the language of madness. Insp... [show more]


12:00 am | 10/25/2020 | https://www.ucberkeley-saai-artistsresidency.com/ | Until 11:59 pm | 10/27/2020

Mithu Sen and Brendan Fernandes

The South Asia Art Initiative at the University of California, Berkeley is delighted to launch Crisis and Creativity: Virtual Artist in Residence at UC Berkeley South Asia Art Initiative with artists Mithu Sen (New Delhi) and Brendan Fernandes (Chicago).

Artists’ residencies and their affiliative senses of travel and mobility with which we are by now all too familiar is all but nada in the time of a global pandemic. Yet, the word residency is inundated with the sensibilities of being in place, of domicile, and of dwelling. Recapturing these senses, Crisis and Creativity: Virtual Artist in Residence at UC Berkeley South Asia Art Initiative has invited artists Mithu Sen (New Delhi) and Brendan Fernandes (Chicago) to experiment with new forms of making, translate embodied creative processes into a digital realm, and craft new modes of audience engagement across dispersed latitudes and time zones.

The 72-hour residency will be live streamed for the entire duration on the SAAI Artist Residency website. The virtual residency is curated by UC Berkeley faculty Allan deSouzaAtreyee GuptaAsma Kazmi, and Sugata Ray.

Brendan Fernandes (b. 1979, Nairobi, Kenya) is an internat... [show more]


Scroll to Top