Courses

Fall 2022

Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Image and/as Identity in Mexico Course Number: R1B Section 1 | CCN: 21455

Ramon De Santiago

Monday, Wednesday: 8:00-9:30am

This course explores how visual and material culture both reflect and construct Mexican identities over time by considering the role images play in the formation of a shared imagined community. By looking closely at select objects from the sixteenth century...

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Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Art and Visual Culture in Twentieth-Century African American Freedom Struggles Course Number: R1B Section 2 | CCN: 21456

Amy O’Hearn

Monday, Wednesday: 9:30-11:00am

Rosa Parks’ mug shot, sit-ins at a Woolworth’s counter in North Carolina, and the March on Washington. These are some of the images that are commonly associated with the quintessential African American freedom struggle in the United States. But why...

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Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Art and Crisis in Neoliberal Senegal Course Number: R1B Section 3 | CCN: 21473

Ivy Mills

Monday, Wednesday: 11:00-12:30pm

Senegal has long been a beacon of art and culture on the continent. In the 1960s, the government of Leopold Sedar Senghor—poet, philosopher, and first president of independent Senegal—famously dedicated 25% of the state budget to art and culture, and...

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Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Monsters in the Ancient Mediterranean Course Number: R1B Section 4 | CCN: 21474

Erin Lawrence-Roseman

Monday, Wednesday: 12:30-2:00pm

What exactly is a monster? From the very beginning, humans have created art representing the world around them, but what does it mean when we leave reality behind and begin making images of fanciful or terrifying creatures that belong to...

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Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Folklore and Contemporary Art Course Number: R1B Section 5 | CCN: 21475

Kristine Barrett

Monday, Wednesday: 2:00-3:30pm

This course explores the use of folk arts, folklore, and “the folkloresque” in contemporary art. We will begin by asking: What is folklore? Who are “the folk” (and who are not)? What kinds of socio-political structures and identities are articulated...

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“Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Tracing Religion and Spirit in the Art of Southeast Asia “ Course Number: R1B Section 6 | CCN: 21476

Katherine Bruhn

Monday, Wednesday: 3:30-5:00pm

In Southeast Asia, religion permeates everyday life. This pervasiveness is informed by a long history of indigenous beliefs as well as exposure to world religions through centuries of maritime trade and the rapid movement of peoples in the contemporary era....

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Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Depicting Food and Drink in Mediterranean Antiquity Course Number: R1B Section 7 | CCN: 21477

Jennifer Black

Monday, Wednesday: 5:00-6:30pm

Illustrations of food — sumptuous, simple, half-consumed, or yet to be hunted — have been central to human art for at least forty thousand years. The centrality of food and drink to cultural identity and survival has lent it this...

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Reading and Writing about Visual Experience: Bodily Possession: The Modern Anatomical Museum in the West Course Number: R1B Section 8 | CCN: 23232

Tulasi Johnson

Tuesday, Thursday: 5:00-6:30pm

This course explores the history of the collection, possession, and display of the human body in Western Europe and the United States, from the 1700s to the long 19th century. We will focus on key moments in this history, including...

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Intro to Ancient Art (Western perspective) Course Number: HA 10 | CCN: 24125

Lisa Pieraccini

Mon, Wed, Fri: 1:00-2:00pm

This course is an examination of ancient art from the Prehistoric through the Medieval periods (with a focus on and questioning of the western perspective). You will be introduced to major (and minor) works of art and architecture from various...

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Baek(je) to (Nam June) Paik: Korean Art in Global Context Course Number: HA 32 | CCN: 30972

Jun Hu, Kwi Jeong Lee

Tuesday, Thursday: 9:30-11:00am

Writing of his Good Morning Mr. Orwell (1984), a first international satellite installation of any kind, Nam June Paik (1932-2006) celebrates how the satellite now allows the artist to “shorten distances by shrinking the earth,” in the same way that...

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Contemporary Art + Architecture from Asia, ca. 1945-present Course Number: HA 37 | CCN: 25793

Atreyee Gupta

Tuesday, Thursday: 3:30-5:00pm

This course will offer an overview of contemporary art and architecture from South, Southeast, and East Asia. Beginning around 1945 and paying special attention to new avant-garde and experimental practices, the lectures will trace the emergence of abstraction, hyperrealism, pop...

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Theories & Methods for a Global History of Art Course Number: HA 101 | CCN: 32307

Anneka Lenssen

Tuesday, Thursday: 12:30-2:00pm

This course is designed to guide students interested in art history—that is, the history of image worlds, objects, material practices, and their shifting and contingent meanings—through the acquisition of the methodological tools and knowledge needed for further study of art...

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The Art of Ancient Mesopotamia: 1000-330 BCE Course Number: HA C120B | CCN: 31194

Benjamin Porter

Tuesday, Thursday: 11:00-12:30pm

The royal art and architecture of later Mesopotamia will be explored in terms of the social, political, and cultural context of the great empires of Assyria, Babylon, and Persia. The course provides an integrated picture of the arts of Mesopotamia...

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Visual Culture in Early Modern Spain and Colonial Latin America Course Number: HA 171 | CCN: 30975

Todd Olson

Tuesday, Thursday: 2:00-3:30pm

The epithet “Golden Age” is commonly used to describe the art and literature of seventeenth-century Spain. Ironically, the complex paintings of Diego Velázquez, harbingers of Manet’s modernity, were produced during the decline of Spain and its Empire in Europe and...

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The Spectacle of Modernity: Art and Technologies in late 19th-Century Paris Course Number: HA 180C | CCN: 30976

Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby

Tuesday, Thursday: 3:30-5:00pm

What form can be given to modernity?  What were politics of modern self-fashioning and visual culture in Paris, the city Walter Benjamin famously called “the Capital of the Nineteenth Century”? This class will focus on the period from the 1860s...

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Art into Life: Modernism and Design Course Number: HA 190F | CCN: 30974

Aglaya Glebova

Tuesday, Thursday: 5:00-6:30pm

How can art shape, inform, and transform everyday life? What is the artist’s role in forming (and reforming) the material conditions of living? Focusing on Europe in the first half of the twentieth century—but also looking beyond this chronological (up...

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African Aesthetics Course Number: HA 190M | CCN: 30978

Ivy Mills

Mon, Wed, Fri: 3:00-4:00pm

How should we approach the grotesque, the exaggerated, the imperfect, the improvisational, the unfinished, and the obscured in African art? Should we read “ugliness” as a sign of the “bad” – either as an intentional signaling of moral deviance, or...

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Undergraduate Seminar: “Fantastic and Eccentrics” Revisited: Painting in Seventeenth-Century China Course Number: HA 192A | CCN: 32248

Jun Hu

Friday, 2:00-5:00pm

This seminar examines one of the most vibrant episodes in the history of Chinese painting, a period that is diverse not only in stylistic expressions, but also in the social and discursive forces that came to bear on painting practice...

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Undergraduate Seminar: The Art and Monuments of Augustan Rome Course Number: HA 192B.1 | CCN: 19161

Christopher Hallett

Monday, 9:00-12:00pm

Augustus Caesar, the first emperor of Rome, inaugurated an enormous building program during his long reign that completely transformed the empire’s capital city.  In this seminar we will consider some of the most famous of his constructions—his Mausoleum (the tumulus...

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Undergraduate Seminar: Revisiting Reception: Old and New World Monuments, Myths & Memor Course Number: HA 192B.2 | CCN: 19162

Lisa Pieraccini

Wednesday, 9:00-12:00pm

This seminar will explore ancient Mediterranean monuments and artworks and their resurgence in Neo-Classical art (reception). It will often juxtapose ‘old world’ and ‘new world’ art and architecture in an attempt to address issues of identity, politics, racism, gender, geopolitical...

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Undergraduate Seminar: Exhibiting Calligraphic Modernism Course Number: HA 192CU | CCN: 25856

Anneka Lenssen

Wednesday, 9:00-12:00pm

Not all artists aim for universal communication. In a modern world of heavily policed borders meant to contain identities, languages, and beliefs within fixed ideas of citizenship, an artist’s address to an audience takes place in a terrain of highly...

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Undergraduate Seminar: Visualization: Medieval and Early Modern / Renaissance Europe Course Number: HA 192D | CCN: 19163

Henrike C. Lange

Friday, 2:00-5:00pm

This seminar investigates the many ways in which knowledge, stories, and power structures were visualized in works of art from medieval and early modern / Renaissance Europe – paintings, statuary, relief sculpture, architecture, and graphic arts, all in relation to...

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Undergraduate Seminar: Berkeley’s Built Environment: Two Residential Neighborhoods Course Number: HA 192G | CCN: 25857

Margaretta Lovell

Thursday, 2:00-5:00pm

Students in this seminar will investigate Berkeley’s residential history with case studies of two distinct neighborhoods, one in the hills and one in the flats. The hills section includes Native American sites, a Southern Pacific Railroad tunnel, and topographically-sensitive platting...

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Korean Art in the Museum Course Number: HA 198 | CCN: 33202

Kwi Jeong Lee

Friday: 2:00-3:00pm

We go to museums not only to see artworks we already know, but also to encounter an art world that is unfamiliar to us. The field of Korean art is one such art world–underrepresented outside Korea. In this course, we...

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Graduate Proseminar Course Number: HA 200 | CCN: 32254

Atreyee Gupta

Monday, 2:00-5:00pm

What does art history look like now? A range of political developments and their attendant intellectual commitments have slowly, but surely, reshaped the methods of art history in the past few decades. In the 1990s, postcolonial theory and deconstruction undermined...

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Graduate Seminar: Modern-Contemporary Buddhist Visual Cultures Course Number: HA 290.1 | CCN: 19151

Gregory Levine

Tuesday, 9:00-12:00pm

The study of modern-contemporary Buddhisms has produced books, articles, conferences, and the like, with significant interventions in “Buddhist Studies.” The mid-20th-century turn towards modern-contemporary Buddhisms is itself significant, often incorporating empirical, critical interpretive, and anti-colonial, anti-racist, feminist, queer, and anti-capitalist...

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Graduate Seminar: Global Medieval Visual Cultures: Themes, Disconnections, and Variations Course Number: HA 290.2 | CCN: 32255

Diliana Angelova

Tuesday, 2:00-5:00pm

Considered in turn, dark and monstrous or glorious and global, the Middle Ages (500-1500) continue to be redefined with each generation of scholars. This graduate level seminar embraces the relatively recent global turn in the humanities to examine thematically select...

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