UC Berkeley History of Art Department

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  • Henrike C. Lange

    Assistant Professor

    Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture
    Undergraduate Advisor

    Ph.D., Yale University, 2015
    M.Phil., Yale University, 2012
    M.A., Yale University, 2010
    Magistra Artium, Universität Hamburg, 2008
     

    • Location:

      432 Doe Library, Thursdays, 12:30-1:30pm
      6329 Dwinelle, Thursdays, 11:00-12:00pm

    • Contact:

      Tel: (510) 643-7290 (messages)
      e: henrike.lange@berkeley.edu

    • More info:

  • Bio

    Henrike Christiane Lange holds a joint appointment in Berkeley's Departments of History of Art and Italian Studies. She specializes in Italian late medieval / early Renaissance art and architecture history and literature. A second field of expertise is historiography in the European and American late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Her art historical research has focused in recent years on Giotto, Donatello, Mantegna, and the history and theory of relief sculpture. Other current projects include Botticelli's Dante, the Italian Mediterranean, and a cultural history of triumphs.

     

    After studying art history and Romance studies (Italian language and literature, linguistics) in Hamburg and Vienna (2000-2008), Lange moved to the United States to conduct her graduate work in art history at Yale University (2009-2015). Lange's German Magister thesis Pisanello's Perspective: Space and Narrative in his Mural Paintings deals with questions of visual narrative, with alternatives to one-point central perspective, and with the spatial involvement of the spectator in painted interiors. Her extensive studies of the Quattrocento in Northern Italy, Florence, and Rome contributed to her qualifying thesis at Yale, Botticelli in Rome: The Sistine Chapel Frescoes and the Meaning of Monumentality. Lange's doctoral dissertation on Giotto's Cappella degli Scrovegni, Relief Effects: Giotto's Triumph offers a new theory on Padua’s chapel at the Arena in relation to a set of specific ancient Roman sculptural sources in an Augustinian theological frame of reference.

    Professor Lange's museum experience includes curatorial and pedagogical projects in Europe, such as for the Kunsthalle in Hamburg and at the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg (2002, 2003) with a focus on the nineteenth- and twentieth-century collections. In the US, Lange conducted curatorial internship work at the Yale University Art Gallery (2011/12, 2013/14, and 2014/15) with a focus on the early Italian collection. Her work on the nineteenth century crystallized during her time as co-coordinator of the Yale Nineteenth-Century Art and Visual Culture Colloquium in 2011 and 2012. This second area of expertise allowed Lange also to work closely with Yale's Center for British Art in the context of research assistantships, teaching and travel fellowships, teaching with the collection, and through her work on John Ruskin, Walter Pater, and Frederic Leighton in relation to the Italian Renaissance.

    See also Professor Lange’s webpage at Berkeley’s Department of Italian Studies.