UC Berkeley History of Art Department

People / Graduate Students

    • Micki McCoy

    • Bio

      Micki McCoy is writing a dissertation on astrology and astronomy in Chinese and Inner Asian art during the Liao-Yuan period. Her interests include the relationship between premodern art and science, trans-regional cultural transfer, Buddhist and Daoist art, and the Tangut Xixia empire. 

    • Mont Allen

    • Bio

      Mont Allen studies the art of ancient Greece and Rome, with the latter exerting the stronger pull on his heartstrings. Particular passions include mythological imagery in funerary art (especially Greek myths as they were carved on Roman sarcophagi) and ancient attitudes towards artistic facture and technique (notably as they bear on questions of iconography).  He is often spotted bicycling up and down the Berkeley Hills, his preferred local habitat. He is also something of a Teutonophile and confesses, rather sheepishly, to having occasionally taught the stylistic dating of Greek monuments through analogy with German synthesizer music.  2012-2013 will see him in Berlin for the year, pursuing dissertation research at the German Archaeological Institute, thanks to generous fellowships from the German Academic Exchange Service and the Charlotte Newcombe Foundation.

    • Bridget Alsdorf

    • Bio

      Bridget Alsdorf (PhD 2008) is Associate Professor at Princeton University. Her area of specialization is European art of the 19th and early 20th centuries, with an emphasis on art produced in France from the Second Empire to World War I. Alsdorf is the author of Fellow Men: Fantin-Latour and the Problem of the Group in Nineteenth-Century French Painting, and essays on Poussin, Cézanne, Degas, Manet, Gaillard, Bonnard, Utrillo, Hammershøi, and Vallotton. She is also on the editorial board of nonsite.org. Her current research examines representations (across multiple media) of crowds and theatrical audiences in fin-de-siècle France, with particular interest in the cultural phenomenon of gawking (badauderie) and the relationship between art and emerging fields of social psychology.

    • Mathilde Andrews

    • Bio

      Mathilde Andrews (2017) studies nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American art. Her research interests include the history of science as it pertains to gender and race, and the picturing of these debates in visual culture. She received her BA in History of Art and French from UC Berkeley in 2016, and her MA from The Courtauld Institute of Art, London in 2017.  

    • Elise Archias

    • Bio

      Elise Archias is an assistant professor of art history at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She has made great progress this past year on her book manuscript, The Concrete Body -- Rainer, Schneemann, Acconci, and is looking forward to it being out in the world soon. She presented work at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, at the ASAP and MSA conferences, chaired a panel at CAA, "Carolee Schneemann and the Long Sixties," and enjoyed participating in discussions at Gallery 400 (UIC) and the Block Museum at Northwestern. She was the recipient of the ICAH award for collaborative research at UIC in Spring 2014, and her graduate seminar, "Writing About Performance Art," has left her with ideas brewing and research files amassing. She has started taking Portuguese lessons, and is pleased to be getting to know her many new, vibrant colleagues throughout the city.

    • Meryl Bailey

    • Bio

      Meryl Bailey (Ph.D. 2011) is Assistant Professor of Art History at Mills College. She recently completed a lengthy research project on the Venetian seventeenth-century painter Antonio Zanchi, and is currently preparing a manuscript on Venetian confraternal art after the Council of Trent. In the past academic year, she enjoyed working with Mills' curators and librarians to incorporate the college's collection of medieval and Renaissance prints and manuscript leaves into her teaching practice. Thanks in part to a Mellon grant, undergraduates in her Northern European Art course worked with the director of the Mills College Art Museum to curate a wonderful exhibition of northern Renaissance prints. When not teaching or writing, she can be found at the baseball field or the basketball court with son Gus (age 9).

    • Jess Bailey

    • Bio

      Jess Genevieve Bailey (2015) studies Northern Medieval and early Flemish art with a focus on critical theory and sacred images. Interested in the interplay between the devotional contexts of artworks and their material histories, she is also excited to deepen her knowledge of Medieval gender and sexuality. Jess is particularly interested in Feminist histories, the pictorial representation of bodies, and early works on paper. Jess holds a B.A. in Art History from the University of California at Berkeley, where she was awarded a senior year fellowship to work on Medieval Japanese buddhist sculpture in Kyoto. Her research addressed visual embodiments of spoken prayer within the 13th century Pure Land practice of Nembutsu or intoning the Buddha’s name. Most recently she has presented at the New York MoMA on the development of digital tools for visual culture research.

       

    • Randip Bakshi

    • Bio

      Randip studies early modern art with a particular emphasis on Mughal art and architecture. He received a B.A. from the University of Toronto and an M.A. from the University of Victoria. At Victoria, he helped establish the graduate student journal, ARTicuate. His other interests include popular culture and gender & sexuality, especially queer cultures in modern South Asia. 

    • Catherine Becker

    • Bio

      Catherine Becker (Ph.D. 2006) continues as Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her book, Shifting Stones, Shaping the Past: Sculpture from the Buddhist Stupas of Andhra Pradesh was published by Oxford University Press on October 1, 2014. She had the pleasure of presenting her paper, "There is on 'I' in Stupa: Building Community at Buddhist Sites in Andhra Pradesh," for a panel organized by Sonal Khullar (PhD 2009) at the 2014 annual conference of the Association for Asian Studies. Catherine has received a research fellowship from the American Institute of Sri Lankan Studies for her new project, "Miracle-performing Monks and Relocated Relics: Artistic Exchange between Buddhist Communities in Andhra Pradesh and Sri Lanka." She plans to spend the summer of 2015 in Sri Lanka.

    • M. Elizabeth Boone

    • Bio

      M. Elizabeth Boone is professor of the History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture at the University of Alberta. Betsy works on nineteenth and twentieth-century art in the Americas and Western Europe and is particularly interested in trans-national relations, the role of art in the development of national identity, and the relationship between art and masquerade. She is the author of exhibition catalogues and articles on such topics as the nineteenth-century reception of Jan Vermeer (1992), paintings of Spain by Mary Cassatt (1995), depression-era murals in San Francisco (2002), nineteenth-century variations on Velázquez’s Las meninas (2003), the use of illustration to mask political controversy in turn-of-the century travel literature (2005), and the comparative use of Spanish painting by artists in Argentina, Chile, and Mexico (2013). She published Vistas de España: American Views of Art and Life in Spain, 1860–1914 with Yale University Press in 2007 and is currently completing a book about Spain at world’s fairs and centennial exhibitions from 1876 and 1915. Betsy spent the winter 2014 semester in Santiago de Chile, where she curated an exhibition of art from the United States and Chile for the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes.

    • Kimberly Cassibry

    • Bio

      Kimberly Cassibry (’09), Asst. Prof. of Ancient Art at Wellesley College, spent her sabbatical year at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she was the Pat O’Connell Memorial Fellow. There she studied Celtic coins and abstract enameling, Roman travel souvenirs, and representations of Gallic warriors. She also participated in a symposium on the Arts of Rome’s Provinces at the Getty Villa and in a CAA Chicago session focused on the afterlives of Roman buildings. She contributed an essay on Julia Domna (her favorite empress) to the exhibition catalogue for Roman in the Provinces: Art on the Periphery of Empire, which opened at the Yale University Art Gallery in Fall 2014 and travels to Boston College’s McMullen Museum in Spring 2015. Having returned to the Wellesley suburbs in August 2014, she misses the excitement of living in New York’s Upper West Side.

    • Wen-Shing Chou

    • Bio

      Wen-Shing Chou (2011) is assistant professor of East Asian art history at Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY). She and her husband welcomed the arrival of their daughter Beatrice in September of 2013. When she manages to peel herself away from watching the miracles of the baby’s growth, she works toward finishing her book manuscript on miraculous visions of the sacred mountain range of Wutai in Late Imperial and Modern China. Her article on early twentieth century wall paintings in the Potala Palace in Lhasa appeared in the April issue of the Journal of Asian Studies. This year, she is teaching at both Hunter and the Graduate Center, CUNY.

    • Huey Copeland

    • Bio

      During his 2013-14 ACLS Fellowship year, Huey Copeland ('06) celebrated the publication of his first book with the University of Chicago Press, Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America, while making strides on his new project, currently titled In the Arms of the Negress: Race, Gender, and the Unmaking of Modern Art. He also co-edited a special issue of Nka on "Black Collectivities"; published shorter pieces on artists Eleanor Antin, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Theaster Gates, Dave McKenzie, and Zoe Leonard; and continued to lecture nationally, most memorably at Berkeley in October 2013, which provided a fitting homecoming and a wonderful kick off to the academic year!

    • Alexandra Courtois de Vicose

    • Bio

      Alexandra Courtois (2009) studies 19th century French art. Her interests encompass a variety of media, (including painting, drawing, printing processes and photography, all relevant to her dissertation research on Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec), as well as Disability Studies, proving to be a productive framework to analyze Lautrec's oeuvre and life in a new light.

    • Sarah Cowan

    • Bio

      Sarah Cowan (2012) studies modern and contemporary art of the Americas. Her research concerns race, gender, the politics of urban space, artist communities, and photography. She earned her B.A. from UC Berkeley in 2011.

    • Matthew Culler

    • Bio

      Matthew Culler (2009) studies early modern art with a particular interest in Italian art and art theory.  He received a B.A. from Kenyon College and an M.A. from the University of North Carolina in 2007.

    • Ramon De Santiago

    • Bio

      Ramón de Santiago researches the trans-Pacific transfer of visual and material culture between South Asia and Latin America in the Early Modern period, with a particular interest in pre-colonial systems of trade in both regions. His theoretical interests include questions of historiography in trans-oceanic systems and visual and material practices. His current project uses multidisciplinary methods to investigate the layers of exchange of objects, goods, and people through world oceanic systems. 

    • André Dombrowski

    • Bio

      On April 11, 2014, André Dombrowski (Ph.D. 2006) organized the conference "Manet: Then and Now" at the ICA, University of Pennsylvania, which many friends and colleagues associated with Berkeley attended, including the presenters Huey Copeland, Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby and Kaja Silverman. After lecturing on Monet in Giverny in May, André returned home to Philadelphia to find out that he had been promoted to Associate Professor with tenure starting in July 2014.

    • Karine Douplitzky

    • Bio

      Karine Douplitzky (2011) was born and raised in France and recently moved to the Bay Area. She has a non-typical profile: a Master's degree in Engineering and an M.A. in Film Studies, followed by many years as a documentary film director. One of her favorite subjects is the History of Paper: she wrote a book on the topic, as well as several articles on related themes such as the power of media. She then spent a year in Japan teaching French literature and cinema. Karine studies under Professor Elizabeth Honig. She is particularly interested in Dutch and Flemish art and hopes to continue research on the question of the Smile. She has eclectic interests, including photography, elaborating themed exhibits and restoring a 12th-century prieuré in France.

    • Thadeus Dowad

    • Bio

      Thadeus Dowad (2014) specializes in the art and architectural history of Europe and the Ottoman Empire in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a special interest in global methods of analysis that address the latent Orientalist residues of art historical research today. Thadeus’ dissertation will examine the first wave of experimentations with “Western” image genres and media on the part of the Ottoman government during an era of heightened reform known as the New Order (1789-1839). His study argues for an integration of Late Ottoman art history into a broader narrative of globalizing image forms that accompanied the expansion of French and British empires in the nineteenth century. Thadeus received his BA in the History of Art from the University of Pennsylvania and his MA from the Graduate Program in the History of Art at Williams College.


    • Nina Dubin

    • Bio

      Nina Dubin (2006) has returned to Chicago with Matthew Jackson and their three-year-old daughter Sarah Jane after a profoundly happy year as Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellow at CASVA. She misses Bibi Obler and Joshua Shannon and much else about DC, which incidentally turns out to be a wonderful place to live. Her project, titled “Love, Trust, Risk: Painting the ‘Papered Century,’” concerns the relationship between French eighteenth-century love letter pictures and the place of credit and trust in romance and economics alike. She lectured on her research at Penn (thanks to André Dombrowski), the Aspen Art Museum and Johns Hopkins in addition to speaking at a symposium at the Musée du Louvre—a lovely respite from the government shutdown. In the fall she resumed her position as Associate Professor at Univ. of Illinois at Chicago.

    • Susan Eberhard

    • Bio

      Susan Eberhard is a 4th year, researching the histories of objects, art and architecture in the global 19th and 20th centuries, particularly in China and the US. Her theoretical interests include questions of value and exchange, material practices, race, and social realisms, using methods drawn from economic, social and political history, visual culture studies, history of design, and cultural anthropology. Her dissertation project examines the circulation of silver as coin, commodity, and crafted object through the Chinese port city of Guangzhou/Canton in the 19th century. She received her BA in art history and critical theory at Swarthmore College.

    • Charlotte Eyerman

    • Bio

      Alumna Charlotte Eyerman, Executive Director of the Monterey Museum of Art, was awarded the insignia of Chevalier in the Order of Arts and Letters on October 3, 2014. On behalf of the French Ministry of Culture and Communication, Consul General of France in Los Angeles Axel Cruau bestowed the honor (the equivalent of knighthood) at a private ceremony in Beverly Hills, CA.

      The Order of Arts and Letters (Ordre des Arts et des Lettres) was established in 1957 to recognize eminent artists and writers, as well as people who have contributed significantly to furthering the arts in France and throughout the world. The Order of Arts and Letters is given out three times annually under the jurisdiction of the Minister of Culture and Communication. American recipients of the award include Paul Auster, Ornette Coleman, Agnes Gund, Marilyn Horne, Jim Jarmusch, Richard Meier, Robert Paxton, Robert Redford, Meryl Streep, Uma Thurman, William S. Burroughs, and Philip Glass.

      Dr. Eyerman was recognized as Chevalier in the Order of Arts and Letters for her promotion of French culture and heritage as a scholar, curator, and museum professional over the past 20 years. Eyerman earned Master’s and Doctoral degrees in the History of Art at the University of California at Berkeley, with a specialization in 19th-century French art and culture.

    • Ellen C. Feiss

    • Bio

      E. C. Feiss (2015) is a critic and PhD candidate studying the history and theory of Modern and Contemporary art, specifically western socially and politically engaged art practices that articulate programs for justice and social utility. She also writes broadly about art after 1960.  Her work has appeared in Afterall, Frieze, Open! Radical Philosophy and Texte zur Kunst amongst others. In 2014–15, she was a resident at the Jan van Eyck Academie, Maastricht and an instructor at the Sandberg Instituut, Amsterdam. She holds an MA from Goldsmiths College, University of London and a BA from Smith College. She also works here.  

    • Elizabeth Ferrell

    • Bio

      In 2013 Elizabeth Ferrell (Ph.D. 2012) joined the growing contingent of Berkeley art history grads living in Ohio when she became Assistant Professor of Art History at Miami University of Ohio, where she teaches courses in modern and contemporary art. In February, she ventured to the big city to co-chair a CAA panel on photographs of women artists in their studios with alum Sarah Evans. She is currently researching collaborations that occurred around The Rose (1958-66), a monumental painting by the San Francisco artist Jay DeFeo.

    • Amy Freund

    • Bio

      After five years at TCU in Fort Worth, Amy Freund (2005) moved down the road to Dallas to begin a new job in the art history department at SMU. Her first book, Portraiture and Politics in Revolutionary France, appeared with Penn State University Press this summer.

    • Jessica Flores García

    • Bio

      Jessica "Jez" Flores García (2012) is a PhD candidate studying contemporary art with a particular interest in Chicano art. She is writing her dissertation on the role of various types of camp, via queer culture, rasquache, and glam rock, in the eclectic artistic production of the East Los Angeles art collective Asco. After completing her MA at the University of Cincinnati, she served as curator for contemporary art at the Cincinnati Art Museum and acted as assistant to the creative director for the 11th Venice Biennale of Architecture. Jez earned her BFA from Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia.

    • Carl Gellert

    • Bio

      Carl is spending 2013-14 on a Japan Foundation Fellowship in Nara, Japan. While there he will be conducting research for his dissertation at the Nara National Institute for Cultural Properties and Archaeological Institute of Kashihara. His dissertation examines the Fujinoki tomb, focusing on an examination of grave-goods and other artifacts from the site as a means of better understanding 5th-8th century mortuary traditions, and Japan’s early relationship with China and Korea.

    • Aglaya Glebova

    • Bio

      Aglaya K. Glebova (2007) is writing her dissertation on propaganda photographs and films of Soviet forced labor camps from the late 1920s and early 1930s.  Along with Michelle Wang, Aglaya was a Townsend Dissertation Fellow in 2012-2013. This summer, thanks to generous funding from the History of Art Department, she visited the sites of the earliest Gulags, including the Solovki islands and the White Sea-Baltic Canal, and conducted archival research in the Republic of Karelia. As a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellow, Aglaya plans to file her dissertation in May 2014.

    • Carma Gorman

    • Bio

      Carma Gorman (Ph.D. 1998) is Associate Professor and Assistant Chair in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Texas at Austin. She is in the department's design (rather than art history) division, and has been enjoying working with students who are earning BFAs and MFAs in design. She and her husband Eric and their daughter Marit relocated to Austin in September, 2013, after fifteen years at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, IL. They are enjoying living in Austin, which has a surprising number of similarities to Berkeley, including excellent restaurants, hills, live oak trees, and nude bicyclists. Carma is nearing completion of her book about the ways in which the USA’s unique legal system has shaped American product design between 1890 and the present.

    • Lesdi Gousssen Robleto

    • Bio

       Lesdi Goussen (2017) studies mid 20th century Latin American Art in a transatlantic context, particularly focusing on the exchanges taking place between Latin America, Europe, and the United States. Her primary research interests focus on comparative modernisms, critical and postcolonial theory and decolonizing methodologies. She is also interested in interdisciplinary frameworks for investigating the intersection among Latin American identity, culture, and art. Lesdi holds a B.A in Art History from New York University and has previously worked at Anthony Meier Fine Arts.

    • Robin Greeley

    • Bio

      Robin Greeley (Ph.D. 1996) has finished a satisfying year as a Fellow at the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute, where she was working on her next book, Between Campesino and State: Photography, Rurality, and Modernity in Twentieth-Century Mexico (under contract with Yale University Press). She'll be presenting some of that material at Berkeley in March 2015, where her PhD student, Anneka Lenssen (MIT 2014), will be taking a position as Assistant Professor.

      Robin also finished off several articles and book chapters on contemporary artists Pedro Reyes, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer and Santiago Montoya, and began work on another book project, Conversaciones: Nestor Garcia Canclini (under contract with Editorial Palinodia, Chile).

    • Diana Greenwold

    • Bio

      Diana is completing work on her dissertation, Crafting New Citizens: Art and Handicraft in American Settlement Houses, 1900-1945. She is currently the curatorial fellow at the Portland Museum of Art in Portland, Maine where she oversees the decorative arts collection. Diana spent last year as a pre-doctoral fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

    • Andrew Griebeler

    • Bio

      Andrew Griebeler (2010) studies medieval and Byzantine art with Diliana Angelova and Beate Fricke. Andrew graduated with a B.A. in art history and biology at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington. Andrew’s research interests include manuscripts, spolia, and medieval science and image theory.

    • Sarah Hamill

    • Bio

      Sarah Hamill was on research leave last year from Oberlin College, working on a new book co-authored with Megan Luke (USC) on how photography has shaped the writing of the history of sculpture. Hamill and Luke were awarded an ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship (2013-2015) for this project. They hosted a workshop on photo archives and the representation of sculpture at the Getty Research Institute in January 2014. And this past October, they organized a two-day, two-venue symposium entitled Sculpture and Photography: The Art Object in Reproduction co-sponsored by the GRI and the Clark Art Institute. Hamill was living in Toronto last year with Chris Lakey, where she completed production on her book, David Smith in Two Dimensions: Photography and the Matter of Sculpture, published in January 2015 by the University of California Press, and awarded a Meiss/Mellon Author's Book Award and a Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant from the College Art Association, as well as a Henry Moore Foundation Publication Grant. Her article "Picturing Autonomy: David Smith's Photography and the Sculptural Group" was published in the June 2014 issue of Art History.

    • Grace Harpster

    • Bio

      Grace Harpster (2011) is a PhD candidate studying early modern Italian art, with a particular interest in the religious art of Counter-Reformation Italy and its wider missionary network. Grace is currently researching for her dissertation on San Carlo Borromeo and his interactions with sacred images.

       



       

    • Sharon Hecker

    • Bio

      Sharon Hecker (Ph.D. 1999) lectured on Medardo Rosso and cultural mediators (KU Leuven); global echoes of Impressionism (Midwest Art History Society); global art markets (Radboud University, Nijmegen); internationalism (Tate Britain). She spoke on Anna Magnani (American Association for Italian Studies—AAIS, University of Zurich), (Association for Studies of Modern Italy—ASMI, University of London); on audiences for Italian art (University of Warwick); on Luciano Fabro (American University in Rome); (Society for Italian Studies—SIS, British School at Rome); Associazione Italiana di Storia Urbana); on Lucio Fontana (Politecnico di Milano). She published Walking Through Walls: Medardo Rosso and Diana Al-Hadid, (Marianne Boesky Gallery), is organizing a Medardo Rosso Study Day/Symposium (Peter Freeman Gallery, New York) and symposium/edited volume “Untying the Knot: The State of Postwar Italian Art” (CIMA: Center for Italian Modern Art, New York).

    • Samantha Henneberry

    • Bio

      This past year, Samantha Henneberry (2008) completed museum study and fieldwork in Greece for her dissertation on Lakonian warrior-hoplite iconography and the role of diverse craft traditions in shaping warrior identity and social memory. While the Jacob Hirsch Fellow at the American School in Athens, she researched in various collections, including the National Archaeological and Acropolis Museums in Athens, Sparta Archaeological Museum, and Altes Museum in Berlin, and traveled throughout the archaic landscapes of the southern Peloponnese (by tiny Peugeot!). This year, with funding from the Frank E. Ratliff Fellowship, Sam will focus on research and writing in Berkeley.

    • Stephanie Hohlios

    • Bio

      Stephanie Hohlios (2015) specializes in twentieth-century Japanese visual art and performance and has an interest in historical modes of picture-storytelling in Japan. She holds both an Art History M.A. and an Asian Studies M.A. from the University of Utah. Her recent Asian Studies M.A. Thesis, Gaitō Kamishibai in Postwar Japan: Picture-storytelling Performance in the Democratic Public Sphere (2015), examines extant painted picture panels from the 1950s that were used in popular picture-storytelling street theater (gaitō kamishibai) to unpack the social significance of pictorial drama and performer presence in the historical moment. 

    • Aaron Hyman

    • Bio

      Aaron M. Hyman (PhD 2017) is Assistant Professor in the Department of the History of Art at Johns Hopkins University. In 2017-18, he will be the Andrew W. Mellon fellow in residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He is a specialist of early modern art in the Spanish Empire, and has published in Colonial Latin American Review, Representations, Art Bulletin, and Print Quarterly, among other venues.

    • Claire Ittner

    • Bio

      Claire Ittner studies twentieth-century modernisms, with an emphasis on the arts of America and the African diaspora. Her research interests include the spaces of creation and display, race and national identity, questions of influence, and archival theory and practice. She earned a B.A. from Davidson College in 2013. 

    • Riad Kherdeen

    • Bio

       Riad Kherdeen (2016) studies global modern art and architecture, with a focus on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. His interests include comparative and alternative modernisms, postcolonial and critical theory, modes of abstraction, the built environment, cross-cultural exchange, intermateriality, and technical art history. Riad holds a B.A. in Art History and a minor in Chemistry from New York University (2013) and an M.A. in the History of Art and Archaeology from the Institute of Fine Arts (2016). His M.A. thesis “Masdar City: Oriental City of the Twenty-First Century,” advised by Jean-Louis Cohen, looks at the urban design and architecture of Masdar City in the United Arab Emirates as a new iteration of the “Orientalized” city within a genealogy of recent urbanism in the Arab world, one that still succumbs to the imagined representations of the region created by European imperialism yet embraces those stereotypes to construct new narratives about its people and its nascent nation.

    • Sonal Khullar

    • Bio

      Sonal Khullar (Ph.D. 2009) prepared her book manuscript, Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930-1990 (forthcoming spring 2015 from the University of California Press), for publication. She was awarded an ACLS Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship for a new book project, The Art of Dislocation: Conflict and Collaboration in Contemporary Art from South Asia. In 2013-14 she presented research on this project in Los Angeles, Portland, and Colombo, Sri Lanka, and chaired a session on collaboration at the Association for Asian Studies meeting. She is completing an essay on murals by George Keyt at a Buddhist monastery and temple complex outside Colombo for a special Sri Lanka issue of Marg edited by Sujatha Meegama (Ph.D. 2011).

    • Kristen Kido

    • Bio

      Kristen Kido (2014) specializes in cultural heritage studies and the law, particularly as it concerns the contemporary circulation of ancient art. Having received her M.A. in Comparative Art and Archaeology from University College London, she approaches her research from a multidisciplinary perspective, with a particular interest in post-colonial theory, cultural memory, and object itineraries. Her dissertation will focus on the intersection between the cultural and legal matrices generated and encountered by a single sculpture, the so-called "Goddess of Morgantina," from the time of its making to its contemporary repatriation to Sicily. Kristen advanced to candidacy in Spring 2017, and will spend the next three years completing her J.D. at University of California, Irvine, School of Law.

       

    • Sunglim Kim

    • Bio

      Sunglim Kim (Ph.D. 2009) is Assistant Professor of Art History and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Dartmouth College. In 2013-14 Sunglim presented her research on chaekgeori screens at the 2013 AAS annual conference in San Diego and at the Triangle East Asia Colloquium at the University of North Carolina, and her research was developed into an article, “Chaekgeori: multi-dimensional messages in late Joseon Korea,” that was published in Archives of Asian Art (Spring 2014). In September, she lectured on the emergence of Korean consumer culture in late Joseon Korea in concert with the exhibition, “Treasures from Korea: Arts and Culture, 1392-1910” at LACMA. With a Junior Faculty Fellowship and her sabbatical leave in 2014-15, Sunglim will focus on completing her upcoming book, Flowering Plums Bloom: 19th-Century Korean Art.

    • Sabine Kriebel

    • Bio

      Sabine Kriebel's (2003) book, Revolutionary Beauty: The Radical Photomontages of John Heartfield was published in February 2014 by University of California Press, thus ending the project where it began, in Berkeley, California. After a brief visit home to Southern California, she is looking forward to giving talks on aspects of her next project -- photography and the so-called New Objectivity -- in Zagreb, Potsdam, and Helsinki this summer. Her co-edited volume on Photography in Doubt is currently under review for publication.

    • Katherine Kuenzli

    • Bio

      Katherine Kuenzli (Ph.D. 2002) is very happy to be starting a one year sabbatical and leave from her position as Associate Professor of Art History at Wesleyan University. She received an ACLS Fellowship for the 2014-15 year to work on her book manuscript, "Designing Modernism: Henry van de Velde from Neo-Impressionism to the Bauhaus." This past academic year she published an article, "The Birth of the Modernist Museum: The Folkwang as Gesamtkunstwerk," in "The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians" (December 2013). She also published an essay, "Expanding the Boundaries of Modern Art: The Blue Rider, Parisian Modernism, and Henri Rousseau" in an exhibition catalogue "Expressionism in Germany and France: From Matisse to the Blue Rider" (LACMA, 2014). Her husband, Michael Printy (Ph.D. 2003), accepted a position as Western European Humanities Librarian at Yale University.

    • Grace Kuipers

    • Bio

      Grace Kuipers studies 20th century American art. She is particularly interested in theories of display and collecting, as well as concepts of citizenship. She earned her B.A. from Wesleyan University in 2014. She interned in Washington, D.C. at the National Gallery of Art’s Department of Photographs before spending 2015-2016 in Berlin, Germany on a fellowship supported by the Fulbright commission. 

    • Namiko Kunimoto

    • Bio

      In the fall of 2013, Namiko Kunimoto (2010) left her position at American University to join the faculty as Assistant Professor in the History of Art Department at The Ohio State University. She is pleased to be working with other Berkeley alumni – Julia F. Andrews, Karl Whittington, and Kris Paulsen. When not on campus, she spends her time chasing after her energetic two-year-old son, Kaz. Kunimoto’s recent publications include “Shiraga Kazuo: The Hero and Concrete Violence” published in Art History in February 2013 and “Tanaka Atsuko’s Electric Dress and the Circuits of Subjectivity” published in September 2013 from The Art Bulletin. She is currently working on her book manuscript, Anxious Bodies: Gender and Nation in Postwar Japanese Art.

    • Rosaline Kyo

    • Bio

      Rosaline is a PhD candidate specializing in 20th century Chinese and Tibetan art. Her dissertation focuses on visual cultures and the codification of body standards and behavior as it pertains to the process of nation building in 20th century China. She examines specific visual propaganda projects and their intersection with contemporaneous political campaigns and practices of image production. She has conducted research for extended periods of time in Nepal, China and the Tibetan Autonomous Region with support from the History of Art Department and the Institution of East Asian Studies.

    • Christoper Lakey

    • Bio

      Christopher Lakey (Ph.D. 2009) is Assistant Professor of Medieval Art at The Johns Hopkins University. He first joined the faculty in 2010 as a Mellon/ACLS New Faculty Fellow. He has also served as Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and the Humanities at Reed College and as Curatorial Intern in the Department of Manuscripts at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Lakey is the recipient of a number of awards, including a Franklin Grant from the American Philosophical Society and a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, where he is a candidate for the Licence in Mediaeval Studies (LMS).

      His research interests include the relationship between art and science in the Middle Ages, the history of sculpture and sculptural aesthetics, and the history of visual theory from antiquity through the Renaissance. Lakey has presented aspects of his research at, among other venues, the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Yale University, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (Berlin), and the Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich.

    • Rebecca Levitan

    • Bio

      Rebecca Levitan studies the art and architecture of the ancient Mediterranean world. She received her B.A. in Art History from Emory University and her M.Litt in Ancient History from the University of St Andrews. She has excavated in Belgium, Greece, and Italy. Her research interests include polychromy, numismatics, and the reception of antiquity in Europe and the United States.  

    • Mary Lewine

    • Bio

      Mary Lewine works on objects deposited into Buddhist statues in East Asia, with a particular focus on stamped and printed replications of Buddha images. She is interested in conceptions of sacred presence, iconicity, ontologies of the relic, and the poetics of the hidden. Her research explores transregional circulations of knowledge and material culture through Buddhist networks; the agency of the seal; and iconographic development. Her dissertation focuses on a particular category of statue deposit prevalent among the deposit assemblages of 13th and 14th century statues from Kansai region statuary workshops and religious contexts, inbutsu kechien kyōmyō. She received her BA in Chinese at Vassar College and an MA at UC Berkeley in the Group of Asian Studies prior to joining the department.

    • Evie Lincoln

    • Bio

      Evie Lincoln's (Ph.D. 1994) new book, Brilliant Discourse: Pictures and Readers in Early Modern Rome is out with Yale University Press. She noted with pleasure that the Renaissance being dead has had an improving effect on the papers and cheerfulness of colleagues at this Spring's Renaissance Society of America conference. So here's to the rebirth of Renaissance Studies!

    • Josephine Lopez

    • Bio

      Josie Lopez (2009) is currently conducting research and writing her dissertation in New Mexico with the support of the SMU Eleanor Tufts Fellowship. Her dissertation examines nineteenth-century political satire and caricature in the prints of Mexican lithographer Constantino Escalante.

    • William Ma

    • Bio

      William H. Ma (2008) is writing a dissertation on the art and craft workshops at the French Jesuit Orphanage Tushanwan in Shanghai in the early twentieth century. His main areas of interest include the artistic exchange between China and the West (Europe and America) during the late-imperial period, regionalism in Chinese art, and Chinese export art in Guangzhou (Canton).

    • Daniel Marcus

    • Bio

      Daniel Marcus is currenlty working at Oberlin College and previously was a visiting scholar in the History of Art Department at the University of Pennsylvania at the invitation of Professor Kaja Silverman. He is working on a dissertation titled The Banality of Speed: Automotive Modernity in Interwar France, which investigates artistic responses to the vulgarization of the automobile. Alongside his dissertation work, he has written regularly on contemporary art and politics, contributing a catalogue essay to the Boston ICA’s upcoming survey of artist Amy Sillman, a reply to October’s questionnaire on Occupy Wall Street (with Jaleh Mansoor and Daniel Spaulding), and numerous exhibition reviews to Artforum and Art in America. For the coming year, he has accepted a position as Teaching Fellow in the Histories of Art, Media, and Design at the Pasadena Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles.

    • Laure Marest-Caffey

    • Bio

      Laure Marest-Caffey (2010) specializes in ancient Greek art with a particular interest in engraved gems. Her dissertation "What's in a Face? Rethinking the Greek Portrait through Hellenistic Glyptic" is directed by Andrew Stewart. She studied History and Art History at the Sorbonne, Paris (B.A.), and at California State University, Northridge (M.A.), and served as Curatorial Assistant in the Department of Antiquities at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

       

       

    • Micki McCoy

    • Bio

      Micki McCoy is writing a dissertation on astrology and astronomy in Chinese and Inner Asian art during the Liao-Yuan period. Her interests include the relationship between premodern art and science, trans-regional cultural transfer, Buddhist and Daoist art, and the Tangut Xixia empire.

    • Elizabeth McFadden

    • Bio

      Elizabeth McFadden is a Ph.D. candidate studying the history of fashion and dress. She was awarded the Mellon Curatorial Internship for this academic year and looks forward to working closely with a strong museum collection of dress. Her dissertation, titled "Merchant in Furs: Art, Commerce, and Animal Skins in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century England and Holland", explores the iconographic tradition and cultural history of fur in early modern Europe. She has presented papers on the materiality of fur at the Rubenianum and in the UK, and has published articles on Jan Brueghel's The Allegory of Taste and Sofia Coppola's film "Marie Antoinette". She earned her BA at Hood College and an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London.

    • Cristin McKnight Sethi

    • Bio

      Cristin McKnight Sethi (2008) focuses on South Asian art of the early modern to contemporary periods. Her interests include photography, textiles, global histories of collecting and exhibiting South Asian objects, art made during the British Raj, and the politics and art historical predicament of craft. Cristin was awarded an M.A. in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin and a B.A. in Art and Visual Culture from Bates College. She has lived in India while researching kalamkari textiles as a Fulbright Fellow, and while studying Hindi as a FLAS Fellow. She is currently researching and writing her dissertation on phulkari embroidery from Punjab under the guidance of Professor Joanna Williams.

    • Ara H. Merjian

    • Bio

      Ara H. Merjian writes from New York University, where he was just granted tenure and promotion to Associate Professor. His book Giorgio de Chirico and the Metaphysical City: Nietzsche, Modernism, Paris was published in June by Yale University Press, and won the College Art Association's Millard Meiss/Mellon Author's Award. He is working on a second book on de Chirico's twentieth-century afterlifes, as well as a book titled Pier Paolo Pasolini Against the Avant-Garde: Heretical Aesthetics, for which he has won a Creative Capital/Warhol Foundation grant. He had the pleasure of visiting Berkeley last Spring, where he gave a lecture in the department on de Chirico's Metaphysical interiors from Ferrara, and got to catch up with old friends. He plays soccer in New York to try to mitigate his pasta intake.

    • Kappy Mintie

    • Bio

      Katherine "Kappy" Mintie is a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at UC Berkeley advised by Margaretta Lovell. She earned her B.A in Art History from Vassar College in 2009 and began her graduate work at Berkeley in 2011. She is currently working on a dissertation titled Legal Lenses: Intellectual Property Law and American Photography, 1839-1890 that examines debates among nineteenth-century American photographers over patent and copyright practices.

    • Verónica Muñoz-Nájar

    • Bio

       Verónica Muñoz-Nájar (2015) studies colonial Latin American art with a focus on the visual and material culture of the Viceroyalty of Peru in the eighteenth century. She holds a B.A. in History of Art from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and an M.A. from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. Verónica is interested in the relationship between art, empire, and transculturation. Her work explores the establishment of regional art schools in Peru’s central highlands, a transitional area between the major schools of Lima and Cusco. Under the guidance of professors Lisa Trever and Todd Olson, Verónica's research addresses the art that resulted from the collision of Lima’s European Enlightenment ideals and Cusco’s nostalgia for the Inca period, during the decades of social rebellion that set the stage for independence.

    • Julian Myers-Szupinska

    • Bio

      Julian Myers-Szupinska (Ph.D. 2006) is Associate Professor of Curatorial Practice at California College of the Arts. He celebrated the tenth anniversary of that program, which he helped to found in 2003. His essays have appeared in magazines, journals and catalogues for Keith Haring: The Political Line, When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes, and in Sterling Ruby: Soft Work. An essay considering transformations in the political economy of space in the wake of Henri Lefebvre’s The Production of Space, will appear in the forthcoming Critical Landscapes on UC Press. He presented “Lynda Benglis in Process” at CAA in Chicago this year, on an excellent panel chaired by fellow Berkeley-ites Sarah Evans and Elizabeth Ferrell. He was recently appointed Senior Editor of the Exhibitionist, a journal of exhibition making founded in 2010 by Jens Hoffmann and Tara McDowell. In Summer 2014 he was digging into the Harald Szeemann archive at the Getty Research Institute, and spent time with his partner Joanna, who is curator at the California Museum of Photography at UC Riverside, and with whom he collaborates under the title grupa o.k.

    • Oliver O'Donnell

    • Bio

      Oliver O'Donnell studies modern art and intellectual history with a special emphasis on the historiography and philosophy of art history. His dissertation, titled "Art Histories of Consequence: Pragmatism and Art Historical Method from Formalism to Semiotics", investigates intersections between paradigms of art historical research and Pragmatist philosophy from the 1890s to the 1970s.

       

    • Bibiana Obler

    • Bio

      Bibiana Obler (Ph.D. 2006) is associate professor of art history at George Washington University, where she has taught since 2008. Her first book, Intimate Collaborations: Kandinsky and Münter, Arp and Taeuber (Yale University Press, 2014), investigates the role of artist couples in the emergence of abstract art. She is currently at work on a second book project, The Anti-Craft Tradition, which examines the relation of art and craft in the late 20th century through a series of case studies: Al Loving's fabric constructions, Rebecca Horn's bodily extensions, Lynda Benglis's ceramics, and El Anatsui's work in wood.

    • Stephanie Pearson

    • Bio

      Stephanie Pearson (2007) studies ancient Roman art, with a focus on wall painting. Her research concerns cross-cultural interactions, concepts of luxury and exoticism, and artistic technique. Museums are another key theme in her work. Stephanie has excavated with the Via Consolare Project in Pompeii and worked in the Berlin Antikensammlung.

    • Kailani Polzak

    • Bio

      Kailani Polzak (2008) is a Ph.D. candidate working on British, French, and Russian voyages to the Pacific and the picturing of human difference in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She spent the past year in New Zealand, France, and Germany with the support of the History of Art Department as well as fellowships from the Social Science Research Council and the Georges Lurcy foundation.  Kailani will finish her tenure as an International Dissertation Research Fellow with the SSRC this fall, dividing the semester between research sites in the United Kingdom and Australia. She is very excited to return to Berkeley in the spring to begin writing and resume teaching.

    • Yessica Liliana Porras

    • Bio

      Yessica Porras (2015) is a first-year PhD student focusing on Colonial Latin American art. After years away from her native country of Colombia, she developed an interest in art history as a way of learning more about her culture and expanding the knowledge of this understudied area. She is looking forward to beginning her work under the guidance of Todd Olson and Lisa Trever. She graduated from UC Berkeley in 2014. Here she developed an interest in the intersection between colonial and indigenous cultures,
      represented in in her Honors Thesis Church of St. John the Baptist at Sutatausa: Indoctrination and Resistance.
       

    • Todd Presner

    • Bio

      Todd Presner just published a new book, HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities (Harvard University Press, 2014), with colleagues David Shepard and Yoh Kawano. A digital platform transmogrified into a book, it explains the ambitious online project of the same name that maps the historical layers of city spaces in an interactive, hypermedia environment. The authors examine the media archaeology of Google Earth and the cultural–historical meaning of map projections, and explore recent events—the “Arab Spring” and the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster—through social media mapping that incorporates data visualizations, photographic documents, and Twitter streams. The digital companion to the book can be accessed at: http://thebook.hypercities.com. Presner is Chair of UCLA’s Digital Humanities program and also professor of Germanic Languages and Comparative Literature at UCLA.

    • Laura Richard

    • Bio

      Laura's (2008) field is Modern and Contemporary Art with a Designated Emphasis in Film. This past spring she taught a course on installation art, and last summer her article, "Anthony McCall: The Long Shadow of Ambient Light" appeared in the Oxford Art Journal. She was the volume editor of State of Mind: New California circa 1970 (UC Press, 2011) and, since 2009, has been the co-coordinator of the Townsend Working Group in Contemporary Art at UC Berkeley, whose mission is to foster interdisciplinary and inter-institutional conversations. She is currently writing her dissertation on the early film and room works of Maria Nordman, a portion of which she presented at the UCSD Visual Arts Graduate Student Conference in March. When she is not in the library or with her three daughters, Laura enjoys trail running, cooking, and playing co-ed soccer.

    • Mark Rosen

    • Bio

      Mark Rosen’s book, The Mapping of Power in Renaissance Italy, was published by Cambridge University Press in late 2014. He is Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at Dallas and part of its newly formed Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History. His piece on Pietro Tacca’s Quattro Mori will appear in the March 2015 issue of The Art Bulletin. He is jealous of those who continue to live in Berkeley.

    • Sasha Rossman

    • Bio

      Sasha grew up in Berkeley and Switzerland. He left the Bay Area in the late 90s to study art history and art practice on the East Coast and in Germany, where he worked in contemporary art for many years and also studied at Berlin's Freie and Humboldt Universities. He then returned to Berkeley to study art, architecture, film, philosophy, critical theory and literary theory across numerous departments- focusing on constructions of space, temporality and history across media.

    • Miriam Said

    • Bio

      Miriam Said (2011) earned her B.A. in art history from Syracuse University in 2009, and focuses on art of the ancient near east and the early Greek period. Her research interests include art of the first millennium with a focus on near eastern cultural cross-roads and interaction with the Eastern Mediterranean world; ritual and religion, and the representation and function of hybrid beings in art. She is also particularly interested in issues of cultural heritage and repatriation, which she hopes to explore in more depth in the coming years. Miriam most recently hails from New York where she spent the last two years working at both The Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art.

    • Jenny Sakai

    • Bio

      Jenny Sakai completed her dissertation, entitled Undoing Architecture: Temporalities of Painted Space in Early Modern Amsterdam, and was hooded at the spring 2014 commencement and is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History at Kenyon College. She received her BA from U.C. Berkeley and an MA from Columbia (Art History and Archaeology), and is the recipient of the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship and the two-year Kress Institutional Fellowship in European Art. Jenny's field of study is early modern Northern art, and her advisors are Elizabeth Honig, Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby, and Todd Olson. Her research interests include early modern urbanism, decay, iconoclasm, reception and the uses of art, the status of representation, materiality, and the relationship between power and painting.

    • Alexa Sand

    • Bio

      Alexa Sand (Ph.D. 1999) continues to work and teach at Utah State University where she is associate professor of art history. Her book, Vision, Devotion, and Self-Representation in Late Medieval Art appeared with Cambridge University Press in March 2014. Last spring she also published an essay, “Materia Meditandi: Haptic Perception and Some Parisian Ivories of the Virgin and Child, ca. 1300,” in Different Visions, an online journal committed to “new perspectives in medieval art” (http:// differentvisions.org/issue-four/), and participated in the symposium, "Medieval Art History After the Interdisciplinary Turn" at Notre Dame, where she was on a panel organized by fellow Berkeley art history PhD, Christopher Lakey. She received the 2013-2014 Researcher of the Year Award from the Caine College of the Arts at Utah State University.

    • Sandra Sardjono

    • Bio

      Sandra Sardjono (2009) studies the art and visual culture of Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on Indonesia. She is currently writing a dissertation on the depictions of textiles in Java from the Hindu-Buddhist period, 8th-15th century. She spent the last couple of years conducting research in the Netherlands as Visiting Scholar in the Leiden Institute for Area Studies, Leiden University. She earned her B.A. from Bowdoin College in Maine and an M.A. from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She served as Textile Conservator at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York and as Assistant Curator of Costume and Textiles at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

      Co-advisors: Joanna Williams and Marijke Klokke (Leiden University)

       

    • Michael Schreyach

    • Bio

      Michael Schreyach was awarded tenure and promoted to Associate Professor of Art History at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. He was a Terra Foundation Visiting Professor at the JFK Institute for North American Studies at the Freie Universität in Berlin in Winter 2014.

    • Andrew Sears

    • Bio

      Andrew Sears (2012) studies medieval art and architecture with Beate Fricke. He received his B.A. in Art History from Emory University. His research focuses on relics, reliquaries, and saints' cults, with a particular emphasis on Northern Europe and the Hanseatic League.

    • Emma Silverman

    • Bio

      Emma Silverman specializes in Modern and Contemporary American art with a designated emphasis in Women, Gender and Sexuality. Emma is writing her dissertation on the Watts Towers in Los Angeles. More broadly, her research is concerned with art's role in the built environment, the visual cultures of social movements, and the politics of folk and outsider art. Emma earned her BA from Wesleyan University in 2006 and graduated with an MA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2012.

    • Delphine Sims

    • Bio

      Delphine Sims studies the history of photography in the Americas. She earned a B.A. in Art History and African American Studies from the University of Southern California in 2013. Her research focuses on the ways in which race, gender, geography, and urbanity inform landscape photography. She previously worked at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art as the Curatorial Assistant in the Department of Photography. There, she organized exhibitions and contributed writings on subjects such as the history of salted paper prints, California landscape photography, mid-20th-century Mexican photography, and contemporary American photography.  

    • Jon Soriano

    • Bio

      Jon Soriano (2012) studies the arts of East and Central Asia, with a particular interest in Buddhist concepts of space and script during the Qing Dynasty. Jon has an MA in Asian studies from CSULB and an MA in ethnology from Cheng-Chi University, and has worked as a researcher at the National Palace Museum in Taipei and as a Chinese-to-English translator. Jon is currently the recipient of a Eugene Cota-Robles fellowship. A recent work appears in the journal Room 1000.

    • Jessica Stair

    • Bio

       

      Jessica is a PhD candidate focusing on the art of Colonial Latin America with a designated emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies. She is co-advised by Todd Olson and Lisa Trever. Jessica is currently conducting research on her dissertation, Textual-Pictorial Literacies in the Techialoyan Manuscripts of New Spain, which examines the relationship between text and image in a corpus of seventeenth-century indigenous manuscripts from Central Mexico. She is particularly interested in the ways in which images played a crucial role in the formation of autochthonous history and identity at a time when alphabetic script had almost completely supplanted the picture in indigenous records. Jessica also serves as a co-organizer for the Townsend Center for the Humanities Working Group: Latin American Art and Literature Working Group. 

       

       

       

    • Jessica Stevenson-Stewart

    • Bio

      Jessica is a PhD candidate specializing in early sixteenth-century Netherlandish art and cultural exchange. Supervised by Professors Elizabeth Honig, Todd Olson, and Darcy Grigsby, her dissertation, Rules of Engagement: Art, Commerce, and Diplomacy in Golden-Age Antwerp, studies the art collections of three foreign merchants in Antwerp and their proximity to specific knowledge communities. She has received fellowships from the Fulbright Commission, the Belgian American Educational Foundation, and the Kress Foundation to support her research abroad. Having flirted in her youth with the idea of going to film school, Jessica also considers herself to be a bit of a film buff. She has a penchant for post-Neo-realist Italian cinema, the French New Wave, New German Cinema, and just about anything directed by Bergman, Fellini, Resnais, and Fassbinder. Prospective students and other friends of the department should feel free to contact Jessica by e-mail.

    • Shivani Sud

    • Bio

      Shivani Sud (2013) studies the art and visual cultures of South Asia, with a particular focus on the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. She received a B.A. in Art History from UCLA in 2012. Broadly, her areas of interest include colonial studies and postcolonial criticism, object and collecting histories, and Indian cinema. Shivani is currently working on her qualifying paper on colonial epidemiological photography.

    • Joel Thielen

    • Bio

      Joel Thielen (2016) studies Japanese Buddhist art. His interest centers on how Zen images reflect their specific contexts, including specific theological ideas, monastic contexts, and national traditions. He is also interested in how Zen practices shift as they move from one country to another—from Japan to the West. Joel received his BA from Colorado College in 2011. 

    • Uranchimeg Tsultem

    • Bio

      Uranchimeg (Orna) Tsultem (Ph.D. 2009) taught courses on contemporary art and Buddhist art at the Department of Art History at the National University of Mongolia in fall 2013 as an Associate Professor and a Khyentse Foundation Fellow. In spring 2014, Orna also taught a seminar on Asian contemporary art for the department.

      She organized a panel on Mongolian Buddhist art at the International Association of Tibetan Studies held in Ulaanbaatar in July 2013, where her Ph.D. advisor Pat Berger joined as a Discussant. Orna submitted her chapters as a contributor to an edited volume Buddhism in Mongolian History, Society, and Culture forthcoming with Oxford University Press later in 2014.

      Orna's other research project concentrates on contemporary Asian art. She presented her new research at the panel "Transnational Feminism" at CAA 2014. Orna received a collaborative research grant from ACLS/Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation in 2014-2015.

    • Ty Vanover

    • Bio

       Ty Vanover (2017) studies 19th- and early 20th-century art, with a particular focus on German, Austro-Hungarian, and French avant-gardes and theories of gender and sexuality. His primary research interests center on homosocial artistic exchange, visual and literary depictions of the male body, and the application of psychoanalytic and critical theory to modern artistic production. He is also interested in the dissemination and reception of German aesthetic and social philosophies in a global context. Ty received his BA in Art History from the University of Virginia and his MA in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London.

    • Karl Whittington

    • Bio

      Karl Whittington (Ph.D. 2010) is Assistant Professor of History of Art at The Ohio State University, where he has been teaching since 2010. His essays have appeared in Gesta, Studies in Iconography, Kunstlicht, Mediaevalia, and The Gay and Lesbian Review, and his first book, Body-Worlds: Opicinus de Canistris and the Medieval Cartographic Imagination, appeared in 2014 from the Pontifical Institute for Mediaeval Studies in Toronto.

    • Elaine Yau

    • Bio

      Elaine Y. Yau (2007) is currently completing her dissertation entitled, "Acts of Conversion: Sister Gertrude Morgan and the Sensation of Black Folk Art, 1960-1983." Additional research interests include African American art criticism, sensory cultures of religion, and theories of the vernacular. She also serves as an editor for Cultural Analysis, an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to investigating popular and expressive culture.

    • Antonia Young

    • Bio

      Antonia Young (2009) specializes in ancient Roman art, with an emphasis on Roman painting. She received her B.A. in Classical Civilizations from Wellesley College and her M.A. in Classics from U.C. Berkeley. As an art historian originally trained as a Classical philologist, her work explores the intersection of ancient Roman art, architecture, and literature. For example, her dissertation, “‘Green Architecture’: The Interplay of Art and Nature in Roman Houses and Villas” (supervised by Professor Christopher Hallett), examines the convergence of art and nature in Roman wall painting and garden design in five domestic—and historically significant—sites in Italy. Her analysis tacks between close readings of these sites and contemporary Latin literature in order to situate what is at work and at stake in Roman gardens—artistically, culturally, and historically—at the level of both “text” and “context”. Her other research interests include Etruscan art and archaeology and the reception of Classical culture (especially the sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum).

    • Patricia Yu

    • Bio

      Patricia (2011) is gearing up for her third year by studying intensive French this summer in order to read the writings of French Jesuits serving in the court of the Qianlong Emperor. This past year she served as a GSI for the first time, teaching the Art and Architecture of Japan. She spent the first two weeks of 2013 in Taiwan attending Academia Sinica’s Winter Institute, where she observed folk religion practices. She also experienced her first snowfall in England while on the Tudor/Neo-Tudor Country Houses travel seminar. She is excited to lead tours of BAM’s fall exhibition, Beauty Revealed: Images of Women in Qing Dynasty Chinese Painting.