Events

Stoddard Lecture Series

The Mary C. Stoddard Lecture Fund was established in 2002 with a bequest of Mary Stoddard to provide a visiting lectureship in the history of art, with a focus on decorative arts, Islamic arts, and the history of textiles. Mary C. Stoddard received her B.A. in the History of Art from the College of Letters and Science at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1947.

 

  • Bowl with Human Feet, Egyptian  Date: ca. 3900–3650 B.C. Polished red pottery Dimensions: diam. 13.2 x W. 13.7 x D. 9.8 cm (5 3/16 x 5 3/8 x 3 7/8 in.) Metropolitan Museum,  Rogers Fund, 1910 Accession Number: 10.176.113 (MMA)

    Stoddard Lecture 2017

    Gerhard Wolf

    Gerhard Wolf, Director of the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Max-Planck-Institut, will deliver the 2017 Stoddard Lecture, Broken Vases, Walking Vessels: Aesthetics and Dynamics of Containment in a Transcultural Perspective (Mostly Premodern)

     

  • Difference/Distance: Picturing Race Across Oceans in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

    ** Please see the conference website for more information. **

    Conference Schedule

    9:00-9:15 -- Welcome and Conference Introduction

    9:15-10:50 -- Panel I
    Diasporic Currents: Locating Blackness Across the Atlantic

    Krista Thompson (Northwestern University)
    The Photographic Archive, Disappearance, and the Black Heroic Figure in Colonial Jamaica

    Olubukola Gbadegesin (St. Louis University)
    The Ekphrastic Life of Sarah Forbes Bonnetta

    Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby (UC Berkeley)
    Brilliance and Blindness from Paris to New Orleans and Back: Creole Degas

    10:50-11:00 -- Break: Pastries + Coffee

    11:00–12:35pm -- Panel II
    Graphing Empire: Fixed Encounters, Moving Bodies

    Kailani Polzak (UC Berkeley)
    Varieties of Inscription: Sydney Parkinson and the Maori Moko

    Bronwen Douglas (Australia National University)
    Encounters, Graphic Representation, and the Generation of Racial Knowledge in Oceania

    Todd Olson (UC Berkeley)
    Sea-Change: Instruments, Swimming, and Race in the Early Modern Atlantic World

    12:35-2:00 -- Lunch (conference participants only)

    2:00-3:35 – Panel III
    Building Boundaries, Crossing Borders: Mixture, Metaphor, and the Racialization of Asia

    Sugata Ray (UC Berkeley)
    (Mis)Translating James Gibbs in the Indian Ocean World: Neoclassical Mosques, Subaltern Cosmopolitanisms, and the Architecture of a Muslim Modernity

    Ashley Bruckbauer (UNC Chapel Hill)
    Negotiating Race in French Images of Embassy

    Thadeus Dowad (UC Berkeley)
    “Islands in the Estranging Sea of Islam“: Ottomans, Race, and Islamic Art at the End of an Empire

    3:35-4:45 -- Concluding Remarks

     

  • © 2016 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Picasso's Demoiselles: Africa, Sex, Origins and Creativity

    Stoddard Lecture 2016, featuring Suzanne Blier. The lecture will be followed on Friday, April 15, by an all-day conference on Difference/Distance: Picturing Race Across Oceans in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. See this page for details.

  • Something New and Rare: A Woven Mexican Feather Shield in Defense Against Islam

    The Stoddard Lecturer for 2014-15 is Professor Thomas B.F. Cummins, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art at Harvard University.

  • Stoddard Lecture -- Beyond Aniconism and Iconoclasm: Refiguring the Image in Islam

    Finbarr Barry Flood, New York University, is this year's Stoddard Lecturer.

  • To Catch the Eye: Revisiting Harriet Powers's Visionary Textiles

    Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

    When Harriet Powers' "Bible Quilt" was exhibited at the Smithsonian in 1974, its label read, "Made by Harriet, An Ex-slave, Athens, Georgia." A curator at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, which had recently acquired another of her visionary textiles, quickly provided Harriet’s last name and a bit more of her history. Made in Georgia in the late 1880s, Powers' quilts had been exhibited at so-called "Colored Fairs" in Georgia and then at the Atlantic Exhibition in 1895, but for most of the twentieth century, they remained in private hands. Their rediscovery in the 1970s reinforced an already growing interest in American quilting and in the African roots of American culture. By 1991, Powers was so-well known among the general public that when the Smithsonian attempted to have her "Bible Quilt" reproduced in China, a phalanx of quilters picketed the museum. Powers' continues to inspire contemporary quilters, poets, filmmakers, writers, artists, and amateur historians. But, curiously, her work has received surprisingly little attention from scholars, including those who specialize in women's history or the American south. Ulrich’s lecture will introduce Powers' quilts to those who don't yet know them and make an argument for why they matter.

[Show All Past Stoddard Lectures]