UC Berkeley History of Art Department

Events

Stoddard Archive

  • From Craftsmanship to Commercial Art: The New Vocations of Design in Late Colonial India

    Until 6:30 pm | 09/28/2018

    Join us for a talk by Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Director and Professor in History, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta.

    Moderated by Atreyee Gupta, Assistant Professor of South Asian Art, Department of History of Art, UC Berkeley.

    Sponsored by Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of History of Art Stoddard Lecture Series, South Asia Art Initiative.

    The event is FREE and OPEN to the public.

    For DIRECTIONS to the Institute please enter "Institute for South Asia Studies" in your google maps or click this GOOGLE MAPS LINK.

    Abstract
    Positioning itself in the early decades of the 20th century in Bengal, the lecture will track a critical transition in the vocation of ‘design’ in colonial India from the realm of handicrafts and the artisanal arts to a new social space of middle class training and practice. It will reflect on the way the skills of designing comes to occupy a new median space between those of ‘fine arts’ and ‘crafts’ within the structures of art pedagogy, and the way a new figure of the professional designer emerges in these years in the early guise of the commercial artist. With a focus on the new “Art in Industry” movement in Calcutta of the 1940s, that served as the country’s pioneering corporate forum for the promotion of commercial design, the lecture will look back at two main trends – (i) the discursive shift from the 19th century category of the “industrial/decorative arts” that dominated the colonial Indian art administration to the new livelihoods of modern graphic and commercial art that are nurtured by the Government School of Art, Calcutta during the 1920s and 30s (ii) the negotiations between the traditional aesthetics of the ‘ornamental’ and the new aesthetics of the ‘modern’ that shapes the art of design and advertising in mid 20th century Bengal.

    Speaker Bio
    Tapati Guha-Thakurta is Professor in History and was the Director of the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta (CSSSC) from 2012 to 2017. Her two main books are The Making of a New 'Indian' Art: Artists, Aesthetics and Nationalism in Bengal (Cambridge University Press, 1992) and Monuments, Objects, Histories: Institutions of Art in Colonial and Postcolonial India (Columbia University Press, and Permanent Black, 2004). She is also the author of several exhibition monographs – among them, Visual Worlds of Modern Bengal: An introduction to the documentation archive of the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta (Seagull, Kolkata, 2002), The Aesthetics of the Popular Print: Lithographs and Oleographs from 19th and 20th Century India (Birla Academy of Art and Culture, Kolkata, 2006), The City in the Archive: Calcutta’s Visual Histories (Calcutta: CSSSC, 2011). She has co-edited two anthologies of essays – Theorising the Present: Essays for Partha Chatterjee (Delhi: OUP, 2011) and New Cultural Histories of India: Materiality and Practices (Delhi: OUP, 2013). Her latest book is titled, In the Name of the Goddess: The Durga Pujas of Contemporary Kolkata (Delhi: Primus Books, 2015).

    Event made possible with the support of the Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

    Event Contact: isas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3608

  • Marble Lion, Vatican Museum

    Azarpay Lecture 2018--Luxury in Rome: Marble, Color, Context, Ideology

    Until 7:00 pm | 04/17/2018

    Rolf Schneider, Professor Emeritus, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich and Guitty Azarpay Distinguished Visiting Professor, UC Berkeley

    Presented by the Guitty Azarpay Foundation and the UC Berkeley History of Art Stoddard Lecture Series.

    Light refreshments will be served.

  • Eleousa: Weighing the Quality of Mercy in a Marian Epithet

    Until 7:00 pm | 04/11/2018

    Annemarie Weyl Carr
    University Distinguished Professor of Art History Emerita
    Southern Methodist University

    This event is a Stoddard Lecture Series Presentation.

  • Stoddard Lecture Spring 2018

    Elissa Auther, Visiting Associate Professor and Windgate Research and Collections Curator, Museum of Arts and Design, Bard Graduate Center.

    Textile Narratives: Andean Hand Weaving and the Rise of Modern Fiber Art
    Artists central to the fiber art movement in the U.S. in the 1960s and 70s, including Sheila Hicks, Ed Rossbach, Ruth Asawa, Lenore Tawney, and Alice Kagawa Parrott, to name a few, shared an abiding interest in Andean weaving and other indigenous textile traditions of the ancient Americas. This paper addresses the origins of the awareness of these traditions and its meanings for artists working in the aesthetically maligned medium of fiber in the post-war period.
     

  • Bowl with Human Feet, Egyptian  Date: ca. 3900–3650 B.C. Polished red pottery Dimensions: diam. 13.2 x W. 13.7 x D. 9.8 cm (5 3/16 x 5 3/8 x 3 7/8 in.) Metropolitan Museum,  Rogers Fund, 1910 Accession Number: 10.176.113 (MMA)

    Stoddard Lecture 2017

    Gerhard Wolf

    Gerhard Wolf, Director of the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Max-Planck-Institut, will deliver the 2017 Stoddard Lecture, Broken Vases, Walking Vessels: Aesthetics and Dynamics of Containment in a Transcultural Perspective (Mostly Premodern)

     

  • Difference/Distance: Picturing Race Across Oceans in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

    ** Please see the conference website for more information. **

    Conference Schedule

    9:00-9:15 -- Welcome and Conference Introduction

    9:15-10:50 -- Panel I
    Diasporic Currents: Locating Blackness Across the Atlantic

    Krista Thompson (Northwestern University)
    The Photographic Archive, Disappearance, and the Black Heroic Figure in Colonial Jamaica

    Olubukola Gbadegesin (St. Louis University)
    The Ekphrastic Life of Sarah Forbes Bonnetta

    Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby (UC Berkeley)
    Brilliance and Blindness from Paris to New Orleans and Back: Creole Degas

    10:50-11:00 -- Break: Pastries + Coffee

    11:00–12:35pm -- Panel II
    Graphing Empire: Fixed Encounters, Moving Bodies

    Kailani Polzak (UC Berkeley)
    Varieties of Inscription: Sydney Parkinson and the Maori Moko

    Bronwen Douglas (Australia National University)
    Encounters, Graphic Representation, and the Generation of Racial Knowledge in Oceania

    Todd Olson (UC Berkeley)
    Sea-Change: Instruments, Swimming, and Race in the Early Modern Atlantic World

    12:35-2:00 -- Lunch (conference participants only)

    2:00-3:35 – Panel III
    Building Boundaries, Crossing Borders: Mixture, Metaphor, and the Racialization of Asia

    Sugata Ray (UC Berkeley)
    (Mis)Translating James Gibbs in the Indian Ocean World: Neoclassical Mosques, Subaltern Cosmopolitanisms, and the Architecture of a Muslim Modernity

    Ashley Bruckbauer (UNC Chapel Hill)
    Negotiating Race in French Images of Embassy

    Thadeus Dowad (UC Berkeley)
    “Islands in the Estranging Sea of Islam“: Ottomans, Race, and Islamic Art at the End of an Empire

    3:35-4:45 -- Concluding Remarks

     

  • © 2016 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Picasso's Demoiselles: Africa, Sex, Origins and Creativity

    Stoddard Lecture 2016, featuring Suzanne Blier. The lecture will be followed on Friday, April 15, by an all-day conference on Difference/Distance: Picturing Race Across Oceans in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. See this page for details.

  • Something New and Rare: A Woven Mexican Feather Shield in Defense Against Islam

    The Stoddard Lecturer for 2014-15 is Professor Thomas B.F. Cummins, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art at Harvard University.

  • Stoddard Lecture -- Beyond Aniconism and Iconoclasm: Refiguring the Image in Islam

    Finbarr Barry Flood, New York University, is this year's Stoddard Lecturer.

  • To Catch the Eye: Revisiting Harriet Powers's Visionary Textiles

    Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

    When Harriet Powers' "Bible Quilt" was exhibited at the Smithsonian in 1974, its label read, "Made by Harriet, An Ex-slave, Athens, Georgia." A curator at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, which had recently acquired another of her visionary textiles, quickly provided Harriet’s last name and a bit more of her history. Made in Georgia in the late 1880s, Powers' quilts had been exhibited at so-called "Colored Fairs" in Georgia and then at the Atlantic Exhibition in 1895, but for most of the twentieth century, they remained in private hands. Their rediscovery in the 1970s reinforced an already growing interest in American quilting and in the African roots of American culture. By 1991, Powers was so-well known among the general public that when the Smithsonian attempted to have her "Bible Quilt" reproduced in China, a phalanx of quilters picketed the museum. Powers' continues to inspire contemporary quilters, poets, filmmakers, writers, artists, and amateur historians. But, curiously, her work has received surprisingly little attention from scholars, including those who specialize in women's history or the American south. Ulrich’s lecture will introduce Powers' quilts to those who don't yet know them and make an argument for why they matter.

  • The Kushans and the Earliest Depictions of Brahmanical Divinities in Gandhara

    Osmund Bopearachchi

  • The Aesthetics of Ornament in the Sixteenth-Century Ottoman and Safavid Courts

    Gülru Necipoglu

  • Abstraction and Intimacy

    W.J.T. Mitchell