UC Berkeley History of Art Department

Events

Archive

  • Multilingual and Multimedia Translation in Qing China

    Until 5:00 pm | 06/02/2018

    During the Qing dynasty, the Qianlong emperor and his court engaged in a broad range of linguistic and metaphorical translations integral to their statecraft. Just as production of texts in different languages became cultural and territorial markers of the Qing imperial identity, so too did command of materials, technologies, styles and forms become signifiers of the all-encompassing history and geography of the empire. This two-day workshop brings together specialists whose work focuses on different aspects of Qing translation to explore parallels, crossovers, and distinctions between processes of literary, artistic, and technological translation. By examining the multilingual production of texts, the replication of objects in multiple mediums, and the creative adaptations of artistic forms as manifestations of a shared enterprise, this workshop aims to provide a forum for rethinking the culture and politics of the Qing imperium.

    Speakers include: Brian Baumann (UC Berkeley), Patricia Berger (UC Berkeley), Wen-shing Chou, (Hunter College, CUNY), Rae Dachille (University of Arizona), Nancy Lin (UC Berkeley), Ellen Huang (Stanford University), Yuhang Li (University of Wisconsin, Madison), Mårten Söderblom Saarela (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science), Weirong Shen (Qinghua University), Jon Soriano (UC Berkeley), Sophie Volpp (UC Berkeley), Yulian Wu (Michigan State University), Yajing Zhang (Palace Museum, Beijing).

    Organized by Patricia Berger (UC Berkeley), Nancy Lin (UC Berkeley) and Wen-shing Chou (Hunter College, CUNY).

    Sponsored by the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Folio form the Palam Bhagavata Purana, ca. 1520–40. Repository: Minneapolis Institute of Art

    Eco Art History: Genealogies, Methodologies, Practices, Horizons

    Until 5:00 pm | 05/05/2018

    Nuclear disasters. Acid rain. The mass extinction of animal and plant species. The devastating environmental crisis that the planet faces today has fundamentally transformed the way we perceive human interaction with the natural environment. New forms of thinking such as postcolonial ecophilosophy, actor-network theory, new materialisms, evolutionary-developmental aesthetics, and posthumanism have challenged Enlightenment distinctions between natural and human history. Can art history, a discipline primarily engaged in the study of human creativity, also breach the natural/human history binary? What would such a history of art and architecture look like? Inescapably located in deep time, the ecological is omnidirectional and rhizomatic in its scalarity. Therefore, rather than focusing on specific sites or temporal periods, the conference seeks to explore the interconnected ecologies of planetary systems and art and architecture practices across a longue durée. It aims to bring forth the genealogies, methodologies, practices, and horizons of ecologically-oriented art, architecture, and visual histories.


    Sponsors: University of California Humanities Research Institute; Institute of International Studies; Department of History of Art; Institute for South Asia Studies, University of California, Berkeley.


    Speakers: Lamia Balafrej (University of California, Los Angeles), Elisabeth de Bièvre (University of East Anglia), Whitney Davis (University of California, Berkeley), Natasha Eaton (University College London), Anthony Grudin (University of Vermont), Meredith Hoy (Arizona State University), Monica Juneja (Universität Heidelberg), Riad Kherdeen (University of California, Berkeley), Gregory Levine (University of California, Berkeley), Ramón De Santiago (University of California, Berkeley), Shivani Sud (University of California, Berkeley), Sugata Ray (University of California, Berkeley), Ivonne del Valle (University of California, Berkeley).

    Organizers: Sugata Ray and Whitney Davis, Department of History of Art, University of California, Berkeley.

    For conference program and paper abstracts see here.
     

     

  • Rembrandt and the Mughals

    Until 2:30 pm | 04/30/2018

    Dr. Stephanie Schrader, Curator, Department of Drawings, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

    Stephanie Schrader will address the 23 drawings Rembrandt made late in his career after Indian paintings that were imported into Amsterdam from Dutch trading post in Surat. Rembrandt’s portraits of Mughal rulers, princes, and courtiers demonstrate how his contact with Indian art inspired him to draw in a different style on Asian paper. Schrader argues that the Mughal compositions Rembrandt copied were not merely foreign curiosities, but carried with them specific associations of empire, trade, luxury, and exceptional artifice.
    A reception will follow the talk.

    Speaker Bio: Stephanie Schrader is curator at the Department of Drawings at the J. Paul Getty Museum, specialising in 16th to 18th century Dutch and Flemish art. Her interest in cross cultural exchanges include exhibitions, publications, lectures and classes on artists including Jan Gossaert, Maria Sibylla Merian and Peter Paul Rubens.

    Sponsors: Department of History of Art Stoddard Lecture Series, Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of History of Art.

  • South Asian Art | Past, Present, Future: A Conversation between the Dhaka Art Summit founders, Nadia and Rajeeb Samdani and New York-based Artist, Chitra Ganesh

    Until 7:30 pm | 04/27/2018

    Panel Discussion with Nadia Samdani, Rajeeb Samdani and Chitra Ganesh

    Nadia and Rajeeb Samdani are the founders of The Samdani Art Foundation, a private foundation based in Dhaka that aims to increase artistic engagement between Bangladesh and the rest of the world and produces the Dhaka Art Summit. Nadia and Rajeeb Samdani will discuss their vision for the Dhaka Art Summit, an international, non-commercial research and exhibition platform for art and architecture related to South Asia. Founded in 2012 by the Samdani Art Foundation in collaboration with the Ministry of Cultural Affairs, People’s Republic of Bangladesh, DAS is hosted every two years at the Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy. Nadia and Rajeeb Samdani were recognized as the world's Top 100 Art Collectors by ArtNet News and received the Montblanc de la Culture Arts Patronage award in 2017.

    Chitra Ganesh is a visual artist based in New York. Ganesh’s work across media includes charcoal drawings, digital collages, films, web projects, photographs, and wall murals. Ganesh’s work has been widely exhibited, including at the PS 1/MOMA, Berkeley Art Museum, Fondazione Sandretto, MOCA Shanghai, and the Dhaka Art Summit. She has been named Robina Foundation Fellow for Arts and Human rights at Yale University Law School, the Estelle Lebowitz Endowed Visiting Artist, and Artist-in- Residence at New York University’s Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program.

    Sponsors: The Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of History of Art, Department of Art Practice, South Asia Art Initiative.

  • Marble Lion, Vatican Museum

    Azarpay Lecture 2018--Luxury in Rome: Marble, Color, Context, Ideology

    Until 7:00 pm | 04/17/2018

    Rolf Schneider, Professor Emeritus, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich and Guitty Azarpay Distinguished Visiting Professor, UC Berkeley

    Presented by the Guitty Azarpay Foundation and the UC Berkeley History of Art Stoddard Lecture Series.

    Light refreshments will be served.

  • Eleousa: Weighing the Quality of Mercy in a Marian Epithet

    Until 7:00 pm | 04/11/2018

    Annemarie Weyl Carr
    University Distinguished Professor of Art History Emerita
    Southern Methodist University

    This event is a Stoddard Lecture Series Presentation.

  • A Line in the Sand: Art, Ecology, and Precarity
    The Berkeley/Stanford Symposium at SFMOMA

    A Line in the Sand takes its title from the sense of precarity and urgency emerging from recent efforts to take unified global action on environmental issues. Epitomized by the mission to mitigate climate change outlined in the Paris Agreement, drawing a line in the sand marks a boundary, the recognition of a critical horizon that demands a collective response and solution. In the wake of the United States' decision to withdraw from this seemingly global imperative, what are the limitations of political action in the name of the environment? Do these strategies reduce Earth to a receptive surface for human action, and narrowly legislate what counts as positive engagement with the environment? Are there ways of visualizing our relationship to the planet — other ecologies — that go beyond conservation, sustainability, and "living green" to address humanity's inextricably deep political, social, and cultural entanglement with the environment? Across art, design, and visual culture, what new forms of action do such ecologies permit?

    http://berkeleystanfordsymposium.com/

  • The Past is Present: Virtuality, Archaeology, and the Future of History -BCNM Spring 2018 Symposium

    Until 4:00 pm | 04/06/2018

    With rapid advances in modern documentation and interpretive technologies such as scanning, visualization, and Virtual and Augmented Reality, how must our study of the past and its material legacy adapt?

    The Past is Present is an interdisciplinary event bringing together scholars, students, technology innovators, and cultural heritage workers in conversation about new methods and tools which are shaping their work.

    Over the course of three days (April 4-6), the Berkeley Center for New Media will provide a venue for an international group to explore critical issues of new technologies. On April 4th, we will begin the program with an opening reception for a VR exhibition around art, archaeology, and architecture. The symposium on April 5th will feature scholarly presentations on topics such as Documenting Archaeology and Architecture; Accessing history through Drawings, Plans, Casts, and Copies; and Academic, Public, and Pedagogical Priorities for the 21st Century. Participants will also grapple with these issues through hands-on demos and workshops alongside professionals in the tech industry on the last day of the event.

    Speakers include: Christophe Girot (University of Zurich), Nicolo Dell'Unto (Lund University), Elaine Sullivan (University of California, Santa Cruz), Eugenie Shinkle (University of Westminster), Adam Lowe (Factum Arte), Brendan Cormier (Victoria & Albert Museum), David Gissen (California College of the Arts), Lynn Cunningham (University of California Berkeley), Rachel Optiz (University of South Florida), Maurizio Forte (Duke University), Stuart Eve (University College London), Sonia Katyal (University of California Berkeley), Ben Porter (University of California, Berkeley)

    Schedule to be announced shortly! For more information and registration details visit the Berkeley Center for New Media website.

    Presented in partnership with swissnex San Francisco.

  • Careers Beyond the Tenure Track

    Until 2:00 pm | 03/14/2018

     Speaker: Robert J. Kett, Canadian Centre for Architecture and Curatorial Assistant of Architecture + Design, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

  • The Princess and the Prayer Scroll

    Until 7:00 pm | 03/13/2018

    Leslie Brubaker

     Byzantine private prayer scrolls are rare.  Most date from the 13th or 14th centuries, and while several of them were written in gold ink only two of the preserved examples — neither of which has ever been published — contain any images.  This paper presents one of the illustrated scrolls, now held in a private collection.  It identifies the woman who owned it, considers the role of private prayer scrolls in the late Byzantine period, and examines the gender issues that this particular example raises.

    Leslie Brubaker is Emerita Professor of Byzantine Art & Director of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham. A comprehensive biography is available here.

    Co-sponsored by the Program in Medieval Studies and the History of Art Department.


    A reception will follow.

  • The Italian ‘Commercial Revolution’: An Archaeological Reading?: A talk by Chris Wickham

    Until 7:00 pm | 03/12/2018

    Chris Wickham, Chichele Professor of Medieval History emeritus at Oxford University and Fellow of All Souls College

    Sponsored by the UC Berkeley Medieval Studies Program

  • Cartonera books from Latin America

    Amateurism Across the Arts Conference

    Until 6:15 pm | 02/09/2018

    Amateurism Across the Arts is an exploration of vernacular, popular, fannish, kitsch, informal, self-taught, user-generated, and DIY production in music, architecture, literature, the visual arts, dance, and new media– especially in relation to raced, classed, and gendered notions of value. How do the implicitly skilled “arts” rupture and reorganize themselves around hierarchies of taste? And how can critical race and feminist/queer scholarship account for “hobbyist” — that is, extra-institutional, self-organized, or improvised — modes of cultural production and circulation? If amateurism has been traditionally disavowed in modernist and avant-garde historiographies, it is at the same time persistently—even obsessively—invoked, and is hence inextricably woven into those discourses.

    The symposium asks how the “high” and the “low” are porous constructions by looking at the ways that these charged terms have been deployed and dismantled across several artistic disciplines, particularly as we examine the alternative economies and systems of distribution that attend such forms of making. While it has become commonplace for “fine” artists to recruit untrained participants into their practices, it is vital to acknowledge that many non-professional forms of making grow out of necessity and survival. In addition, though “amateur” is frequently used as a shorthand for the unpracticed and/or uninteresting, this conference seeks to understand its connections to its root word amare: a complex outgrowth of critical investment, pleasure, and love.

    Schedule of Events

    Organized by Julia Bryan-Wilson, Director, Arts Research Center
     

  • AAVC Workshop with Stacey Sloboda

    Until 6:00 pm | 03/08/2018

    Stacey Sloboda

     

    Please join the Asian Art and Visual Cultures Working Group for an upcoming workshop with Stacey Sloboda, Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

     

    Professor Sloboda specializes in 18th- and 19th-century histories of ornament, decorative arts, and collecting and display and has published extensively on the global histories of Chinese porcelain. We will be discussing her recent co-edited volume Eighteenth-Century Art Worlds: Global and Local Geographies of Art, which examines the interwoven and cross-cultural histories of Chinese, Japanese, Indian, and European design. We hope that this workshop can be an opportunity to discuss Professor Sloboda's current research and, more broadly, consider our own work in relation to emergent scholarship on global art histories. Please contact Shivani Sud for readings.

     

  • Stoddard Lecture Spring 2018

    Elissa Auther, Visiting Associate Professor and Windgate Research and Collections Curator, Museum of Arts and Design, Bard Graduate Center.

    Textile Narratives: Andean Hand Weaving and the Rise of Modern Fiber Art
    Artists central to the fiber art movement in the U.S. in the 1960s and 70s, including Sheila Hicks, Ed Rossbach, Ruth Asawa, Lenore Tawney, and Alice Kagawa Parrott, to name a few, shared an abiding interest in Andean weaving and other indigenous textile traditions of the ancient Americas. This paper addresses the origins of the awareness of these traditions and its meanings for artists working in the aesthetically maligned medium of fiber in the post-war period.
     

  • Embrace, 2005, Emily Jacir

    Emily Jacir in conversation with Natalia Brizuela, Ahmad Diab, and Atreyee Gupta

    Until 1:30 pm | 02/15/2018

    The artist Emily Jacir (Spring 2018 Regents' Lecturer) in conversation with Natalia Brizuela, Associate Professor, Film and Media, and Spanish and Portuguese; Ahmad Diab, Assistant Professor, Near Eastern Studies; and Atreyee Gupta, Assistant Professor, History of Art.