Events

Departmental Events

  • Fourth Annual CAA Preview

    Until 2:00 pm | 02/02/2018

    Ivy Mills, Emma R. Silverman, Imogen Hart, Rebecca Levitan and Grace Harpster

    Morning Papers
    10:00 – 10:40 Ivy Mills, "Maimouna Guerresi's Woman-Minaret."
     
    10:40 – 11:20 Emma R. Silverman, “Making a Modern Monument: Photography and the Watts Towers.”
     
    11:20 – 12:00 Imogen Hart, "Inside Out: Exhibiting Decorative Art Between the Wars."
     
    12:00 – 12:30 Break. Coffee and light refreshments will be served.
     
    Afternoon Papers
    12:30 – 1:10 Rebecca Levitan, "Pasquino the ‘Speaking Statue’: How a Hellenistic Sculpture Became the Voice of Early Modern Rome."
     
    1:10 – 1:50 Grace Harpster, “Figino’s True Effigy: Portraits of Carlo Borromeo as Saintly Testimony.”

  • Open House + Arts/Visual Collections Showcase

    Until 6:00 pm | 02/13/2018

     The Art History/Classics Library and the History of Art Visual Resources Center is hosting an event to bring together the many arts-related and visual scholarly resources and scholarly output from around the UC Berkeley campus and beyond. Please join us and learn more about these arts/visual collections at our Open House + Collections Showcase. It will be a book-fair style event with outreach materials and collection highlights from the many collections around campus, the California Digital Library, and the University of California Press.

  • Translation as Research: Ahmad Diab and Anneka Lenssen in conversation with Saleh al-Jumaie

    Ahmad Diab and Anneka Lenssen in conversation with Saleh al-Jumaie

    Anneka Lenssen (Assistant Professor, Global Modern Art, UC Berkeley) and Ahmad Diab (Assistant Professor of Arabic Literature, UC Berkeley) will speak with Iraqi artist Saleh al-Jumaie (b. al-Suwaira, 1939) on the notion of translation as research. The trio will open their conversation with a reading–in English and in Arabic–of the radical “New Visions” manifesto, whichal-Jumaie and five other young artists published in Baghdad in 1969, and which has been newly translated by Lenssen and Nada Shabout for the forthcoming Museum of Modern Art anthology Modern Art in the Arab World: Primary Documents. In light of recent efforts in the United States to revisit and revive Arab modernist and avant-garde histories by means of translation, how do we understand the hopes and challenges of this period? Or grapple with the stakes of al-Jumaie’s work and struggle? To what extent did Iraqi artists themselves, located in the complicated colonial and post-colonial conditions of 1960s Iraq, already work by translation—between languages, materials, and worldview? And in what ways might such translations-as-research intervene upon contemporary cultural practice?

    Translation as Research: February 13

  • Stoddard Lecture Spring 2018

    Elissa Auther, Visiting Associate Professor and Windgate Research and Collections Curator, Museum of Arts and Design, Bard Graduate Center.

    Textile Narratives: Andean Hand Weaving and the Rise of Modern Fiber Art
    Artists central to the fiber art movement in the U.S. in the 1960s and 70s, including Sheila Hicks, Ed Rossbach, Ruth Asawa, Lenore Tawney, and Alice Kagawa Parrott, to name a few, shared an abiding interest in Andean weaving and other indigenous textile traditions of the ancient Americas. This paper addresses the origins of the awareness of these traditions and its meanings for artists working in the aesthetically maligned medium of fiber in the post-war period.
     

  • A Line in the Sand: Art, Ecology, and Precarity
    The Berkeley/Stanford Symposium at SFMOMA

    A Line in the Sand takes its title from the sense of precarity and urgency emerging from recent efforts to take unified global action on environmental issues. Epitomized by the mission to mitigate climate change outlined in the Paris Agreement, drawing a line in the sand marks a boundary, the recognition of a critical horizon that demands a collective response and solution. In the wake of the United States' decision to withdraw from this seemingly global imperative, what are the limitations of political action in the name of the environment? Do these strategies reduce Earth to a receptive surface for human action, and narrowly legislate what counts as positive engagement with the environment? Are there ways of visualizing our relationship to the planet — other ecologies — that go beyond conservation, sustainability, and "living green" to address humanity's inextricably deep political, social, and cultural entanglement with the environment? Across art, design, and visual culture, what new forms of action do such ecologies permit?

    http://berkeleystanfordsymposium.com/

  • Stoddard Lecture Spring 2019

    The Department is pleased to announce that Thelma Thomas, New York University Institute of Fine Arts, will be the Stoddard Lecturer in spring 2019. Please check this page again for details. (Please note that the date is tentative.)

  • Insurgent Imaginaries: Art and Iconoclasm in the Eighteenth-Century Andes

    Ananda Cohen-Aponte, Cornell University

    This presentation focuses on the production, modification, and destruction of images within the context of the Tupac Amaru (1780–1783) and Tupac Katari (1780–1781) Rebellions of the southern Andes. Historians and anthropologists have produced numerous studies on the sociocultural, economic, and political dimensions of anticolonial movements in the Andes. The visual and aesthetic aspects of these rebellions, however, remain largely overlooked in the scholarly literature. Drawing on new field and archival research, this presentation considers interventions into the material world as a form of political praxis. In particular, it analyzes several case studies involving the breaking, burning, and modification of artworks by rebels and royalists alike, calling into question the terms under which we define defacement and censorship. This presentation looks at a variety of objects, including portraits, textiles, sculptures, and khipus in order to highlight the diverse visual worlds that intervened in the practice of political subversion.

  • From SFMOMA to the Ghost Ship: Exploring Bay Area Arts Ecosystems

    UC Berkeley Undergraduate Seminar Final Projects Launch Event
    Please join us at La Peña in the Lounge for brief presentations and discussion of collaborative research projects developed during the Fall semester.

    Light Snacks

    Free • The Public is cordially invited!
    Presented by

    “From SFMOMA to the Ghost Ship: Exploring Bay Area Arts Ecosystems”
    UC Berkeley History of Art Department and American Studies Program

    Special thanks to La Peña
    “Promoting social justice, arts participation and intercultural understanding since 1975” 

  • Between “dirty ghosts” and “a tailor’s dummy”: The Contested Form of the Victorian Public Statue

    Claire Jones, University of Birmingham

    Britain’s streets, squares, parks, and public buildings are peopled with statues which were mainly commissioned, produced, and erected during the Victorian period. These generally follow a similar format—a white, middle-aged man a frockcoat, standing on a four-foot-high plinth. Today these statues are rarely remarked upon, except when their subject is challenged and debated. Yet the apparent homogeneity and conservatism of these figures belie the fact that, in its day, the portrait statue was one of the most contested forms of sculpture. This paper will examine how, in sculptural terms, these statues reveal a profound experiment in modelling modern man.
     
    Dr. Claire Jones is a Lecturer in the Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies, University of Birmingham, UK. Her research centres on the history of sculpture, and she is completing a monograph on sculpture in 19th-century Britain, which examines the ways in which sculptors attempted to make sculpture more relevant to contemporary life. Her publications include Sculptors and Design Reform in France, 1848–1895: Sculpture and the Decorative Arts (Ashgate, 2014), and she is co-editing Sculpture and the Decorative in Britain and Europe, 17th Century to Contemporary, with Imogen Hart (UC Berkeley).

    This event is sponsored by the Center for British Studies and the History of Art Department.
     

     

     

  • Between “dirty ghosts” and “a tailor’s dummy”: The Contested Form of the Victorian Public Statue

    Claire Jones, University of Birmingham

    Britain’s streets, squares, parks, and public buildings are peopled with statues which were mainly commissioned, produced, and erected during the Victorian period. These generally follow a similar format—a white, middle-aged man a frockcoat, standing on a four-foot-high plinth. Today these statues are rarely remarked upon, except when their subject is challenged and debated. Yet the apparent homogeneity and conservatism of these figures belie the fact that, in its day, the portrait statue was one of the most contested forms of sculpture. This paper will examine how, in sculptural terms, these statues reveal a profound experiment in modelling modern man.
     
    Dr. Claire Jones is a Lecturer in the Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies, University of Birmingham, UK. Her research centres on the history of sculpture, and she is completing a monograph on sculpture in 19th-century Britain, which examines the ways in which sculptors attempted to make sculpture more relevant to contemporary life. Her publications include Sculptors and Design Reform in France, 1848–1895: Sculpture and the Decorative Arts (Ashgate, 2014), and she is co-editing Sculpture and the Decorative in Britain and Europe, 17th Century to Contemporary, with Imogen Hart (UC Berkeley).

    This event is sponsored by the Center for British Studies and the History of Art Department.
     

     

     

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