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  • “Through the Eyes of Another: Visions of Arhats in Song-Dynasty China”

    Phillip Bloom, Indiana University, Bloomington

    Crafted between 1178 and 1188 for ritual use in a small temple near Ningbo, the one hundred hanging scrolls of the Five Hundred Arhats (Daitokuji, Kyoto, Japan) possess a striking peculiarity: more often than not, the set’s eponymous semi-divine monks are simply shown gazing. They gaze at natural wonders, they gaze at supernatural feats performed by their peers, they gaze at episodes from the mytho-history of Buddhism, and most importantly, they gaze even at paintings. How are we to understand these scrolls’ insistence on acts of viewing, and how might Song worshippers have responded? Through their practice of gazing, do these arhats merely model for us how we ought to look, or are other motivations at work? To make sense of the multiple forms of spectatorial engagement facilitated by these scrolls, this presentation will bring them into dialogue with contemporaneous poems that describe imaginative acts of entering painted worlds and with liturgies that prescribe the performative inhabitation of other subject positions. Drawing on such texts, I shall argue that the Five Hundred Arhats and other works of Song Buddhist art seek to create possibilities for intersubjective experience—for viewing the world through the eyes of an awakened other.


    Phillip E. Bloom is Assistant Professor of East Asian Art History in the Department of Art History at Indiana University, Bloomington. He specializes in the history of Song-dynasty Buddhist art and ritual. His work has recently appeared in The Art Bulletin and Bukkyō geijutsu, and he is currently completing a book manuscript, tentatively titled Nebulous Intersections: Ritual and Representation in Chinese Buddhist Art, ca. 1178.
     

  • New Technologies and Archaeology

    Michael Ashley (Codify)
    Center for Digital Archaeology
    Lynn Cunningham (Berkeley Visual Resources Center)
    CyArk
    Oculus
    Rita Lucarelli (Berkeley Near Eastern Studies)
    Matt Naglak (Michigan Classical Archaeology)
    Ren Ng (Berkeley Computer Science)
    Justin Underhill (Berkeley Digital Humanities)

    An event bringing together technology innovators, cultural heritage workers, and scholars in a conversation about scanning, visualization, Virtual and Augmented Reality, and other digital tools that are changing the field of Archaeology. Followed by a roundtable discussion and a visit to the newly re-opened Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology. 2-5 PM

     

    For more information and to RSVP

  • The new SFMOMA, view from Yerba Buena Gardens; photo © Henrik Kam, courtesy SFMOMA

    Not At Home: Migration, Pilgrimage, and Displacement in Art, Design, and Visual Culture

    The inaugural Berkeley/Stanford Symposium will be held at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) in Spring, 2017. Not at Home is an opportunity to discuss how visual material has registered changing relations to home over time. Papers, panels, and performance pieces speak to how home and its opposites – displacement, estrangement, voyage, or exile – manifest in visual expression and material culture throughout history. They ask, among other questions, if home is denied, rejected, or destroyed, what are the spaces of not-at-home, and how are they visually created? Join us for a critically and politically engaged dialog across disciplines, temporalities, and creative practice.

    Organized in the 2016/2017 academic year by Danny Smith (Stanford) and Jess Genevieve Bailey (UC Berkeley), the Berkeley/Stanford Symposium is an annual gathering of emerging voices in the arts. The symposia seek to support graduate students in all fields as well as young artists, museum professionals, and writers.

    Free of charge and open to the public. Program and keynote speaker to follow. 

  • Bowl with Human Feet, Egyptian  Date: ca. 3900–3650 B.C. Polished red pottery Dimensions: diam. 13.2 x W. 13.7 x D. 9.8 cm (5 3/16 x 5 3/8 x 3 7/8 in.) Metropolitan Museum,  Rogers Fund, 1910 Accession Number: 10.176.113 (MMA)

    Stoddard Lecture 2017

    Gerhard Wolf

    Gerhard Wolf, Director of the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Max-Planck-Institut, will deliver the 2017 Stoddard Lecture, Broken Vases, Walking Vessels: Aesthetics and Dynamics of Containment in a Transcultural Perspective (Mostly Premodern)

     

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