Events

Departmental Events

  • Laal Paree

    Cinephiles, Fandoms, and Global Media Cultures: Indian Cinema from a Transcultural Perspective

    This roundtable addresses the transcultural nature of Indian cinema, both past and present. Following the liberalization of India’s economy in the early 1990s, histories of Indian cinema have either focused on the reception of Indian films vis-a-vis cosmopolitan constructions of South Asian diasporic subjectivities or have examined the ways in which an image of the nation has been constructed in and through Indian cinema. What is less understood and explored is the integration, consumption, and vernacularization of Indian cinema in various contexts outside India, for instance in Latin America and Africa.

    Cinephiles, Fandoms, and Global Media Cultures aims to highlight recent engagements with transcultural Indian cinema by scholars based in the Bay Area. Speakers include: ​Usha Iyer, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies, Stanford University; Jayson Beaster-Jones, Associate Professor of Music in the Global Arts Studies Program, University of California, Merced; Ajay Gehlawat, Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Theatre, and Film, Sonoma State University; Ivy Mills, Lecturer in the History of Art Department, University of California, Berkeley; Rachael Hyland, Ph.D. Student in South Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley. Lalitha Gopalan, Associate Professor of Radio, Television, and Film at the University of Texas at Austin, will give the keynote address.


    This event will be held in conjunction with the opening reception of the exhibition “Love Across the Global South: Popular Cinema Cultures of India and Senegal" in the Bernice Layne Brown Gallery, Doe Library. The exhibition highlights the interconnected nature of Senegalese Indian cinema fan culture and the Indian films that inspire it.

    Both the roundtable and exhibition reception will be free and open to the public. Program to follow.

    Event made possible with the support of the Townsend Center of Humanities, the Institute of South Asia Studies, the Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, the History of Art Department, and the Asian Art and Visual Cultures Working Group.

     

     

    Campus Events Calendar page

  • Slavs and Tatars, Love Letters No. 3. woolen yarn, 2013, 250x250 cm

    The Idea of “Global Modernism": A Symposium

    The symposium addresses the emergence of “global modernism” as an intellectual, professional, and pedagogical rubric for the academic and critical study of modern visual and spatial arts around the world (nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century), with special attention to its formations at Berkeley. To some extent, “global modernism” (singular) might designate the transnational dissemination and intercultural reception of certain modernist arts, whether European-originated or not, and/or the identification of worldwide characteristics of modern(ist) arts relative to “pre-modern,” “early modern,” or “indigenous” traditions in their particular global contexts. To some extent, it might designate the conceptual field within which many modernisms (plural) around the world—sometimes described as “multiple modernisms” and “alternate modernisms”—might be studied in comparative, cross-cultural, postcolonial, transnational, and/or “global” frames that organize new directions of teaching and research. What are the backgrounds, stakes, and warrants of these or other ideas of artistic modernism(s) treated as global phenomenon/a? Is it now possible to articulate historiographies of the idea of “global modernism”? How does “global modern(ism)” relate to the parallel emergence of “global early modern,” “global medieval,” “global ancient,” and “globalprehistoric”? How does it relate to initiatives in “world art studies”? How does it relate to processes of socioeconomic and cultural “globalization”? What kinds of intellectual practices and professional training/experience does it seem to require—potentially changing the shape of disciplines, jobs, curricula, and research programs? How are major global research universities like Berkeley situated to contribute (or not)? (One goal of the symposium is to advance thinking about, and on behalf of, Berkeley’s increasing visibility as a center of “global modern studies.”)

    The symposium will continue on Saturday, October 21 in 308A Doe Library. Please check back for more information about the program.

    Organizers: Whitney Davis and Anneka Lenssen, History of Art, University of California at Berkeley

    Sponsors: Department of History of Art; Townsend Center for the Humanities; The George C. and Helen N. Pardee Chair II at the University of California, Berkeley.

     

     

     

  • Stoddard Lecture Spring 2018

    The Department is pleased to announce that Elissa Auther, Visiting Associate Professor and Windgate Research and Collections Curator, Museum of Arts and Design, Bard Graduate Center, will be the Stoddard Lecturer in spring 2018. Please check this page again for details. (Please note that the date is tentative.) 

  • Berkeley/Stanford joint graduate student symposium

    Save the Date!

  • Stoddard Lecture Spring 2019

    The Department is pleased to announce that Thelma Thomas, New York University Institute of Fine Arts, will be the Stoddard Lecturer in spring 2019. Please check this page again for details. (Please note that the date is tentative.)

  • Seated Guanyin Bodhisattva

    Return of Ten Thousand Dharmas: A Celebration in Honor of Patricia Berger

    Until 4:45 pm | 05/06/2017

    Please join us for "Return of Ten Thousand Dharmas: A Celebration in Honor of Patricia Berger" on May 5–6, 2017.

    Patricia Berger served as the curator of Chinese art at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco from 1982 to 1994. She then returned to her alma mater to mentor another generation of graduate students as Professor of Chinese Art at the University of California at Berkeley. In celebration of her well-deserved retirement, we invite you to join her current and former students and colleagues to honor her contributions to the field. Professor Berger will deliver a keynote lecture on Friday, May 5 at the David Brower Center, followed by a one-day symposium on Saturday, May 6, 2017 in the Heyns Room at the Faculty Club. This event is free and open to the public.

    The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Department of History of Art, Institute of East Asian Studies, and Mongolia Initiative.

    For more information, please visit Return of Ten Thousand Dharmas: A Celebration in Honor of Patricia Berger, or if you have further questions, contact tenthousanddharmas@berkeley.edu.

  • “Through the Eyes of Another: Visions of Arhats in Song-Dynasty China”

    Phillip Bloom, Indiana University, Bloomington

    Crafted between 1178 and 1188 for ritual use in a small temple near Ningbo, the one hundred hanging scrolls of the Five Hundred Arhats (Daitokuji, Kyoto, Japan) possess a striking peculiarity: more often than not, the set’s eponymous semi-divine monks are simply shown gazing. They gaze at natural wonders, they gaze at supernatural feats performed by their peers, they gaze at episodes from the mytho-history of Buddhism, and most importantly, they gaze even at paintings. How are we to understand these scrolls’ insistence on acts of viewing, and how might Song worshippers have responded? Through their practice of gazing, do these arhats merely model for us how we ought to look, or are other motivations at work? To make sense of the multiple forms of spectatorial engagement facilitated by these scrolls, this presentation will bring them into dialogue with contemporaneous poems that describe imaginative acts of entering painted worlds and with liturgies that prescribe the performative inhabitation of other subject positions. Drawing on such texts, I shall argue that the Five Hundred Arhats and other works of Song Buddhist art seek to create possibilities for intersubjective experience—for viewing the world through the eyes of an awakened other.


    Phillip E. Bloom is Assistant Professor of East Asian Art History in the Department of Art History at Indiana University, Bloomington. He specializes in the history of Song-dynasty Buddhist art and ritual. His work has recently appeared in The Art Bulletin and Bukkyō geijutsu, and he is currently completing a book manuscript, tentatively titled Nebulous Intersections: Ritual and Representation in Chinese Buddhist Art, ca. 1178.
     

  • New Technologies and Archaeology

    Michael Ashley (Codify)
    Center for Digital Archaeology
    Lynn Cunningham (Berkeley Visual Resources Center)
    CyArk
    Oculus
    Rita Lucarelli (Berkeley Near Eastern Studies)
    Matt Naglak (Michigan Classical Archaeology)
    Ren Ng (Berkeley Computer Science)
    Justin Underhill (Berkeley Digital Humanities)

    An event bringing together technology innovators, cultural heritage workers, and scholars in a conversation about scanning, visualization, Virtual and Augmented Reality, and other digital tools that are changing the field of Archaeology. Followed by a roundtable discussion and a visit to the newly re-opened Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology. 2-5 PM

     

    For more information and to RSVP

  • The new SFMOMA, view from Yerba Buena Gardens; photo © Henrik Kam, courtesy SFMOMA

    Not At Home: Migration, Pilgrimage, and Displacement in Art, Design, and Visual Culture

    The inaugural Berkeley/Stanford Symposium will be held at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) in Spring, 2017. Not at Home is an opportunity to discuss how visual material has registered changing relations to home over time. Papers, panels, and performance pieces speak to how home and its opposites – displacement, estrangement, voyage, or exile – manifest in visual expression and material culture throughout history. They ask, among other questions, if home is denied, rejected, or destroyed, what are the spaces of not-at-home, and how are they visually created? Join us for a critically and politically engaged dialog across disciplines, temporalities, and creative practice.

    Organized in the 2016/2017 academic year by Danny Smith (Stanford) and Jess Genevieve Bailey (UC Berkeley), the Berkeley/Stanford Symposium is an annual gathering of emerging voices in the arts. The symposia seek to support graduate students in all fields as well as young artists, museum professionals, and writers.

    Free of charge and open to the public. Program and keynote speaker to follow. 

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