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  • Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby and Sugata Ray in Conversation in Berlin

    Body and Empire: A Conversation

    Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby
    Still Thinking about Olympia’s Maid

     Opening with Manet’s voyage to Brazil after the second French abolition of slavery, this talk focuses on the too often overlooked black woman in Manet’s Olympia (1863) and the model Laure who posed for this painting and others. Manet’s painting stages a creole scene that makes visible France’s long reliance on slavery, but also its Revolutionary redefinition of all blacks as paid workers after the second abolition of slavery in 1848. How does thinking about the entry of blacks, specifically black women, into France’s economy of wage labor differently illuminate Manet’s painting?

     

    Sugata Ray
    Of the "Effeminate" Buddha and the Making of an Indian Art History

    Internalizing colonial accusations of the “effeminacy” of the native male body, nineteenth-century Indian ideologues and reformers attempted to redeem the national body through a range of phallocentric body cultures. Anti-colonial art history, however, deliberately appropriated colonizing discourses of the effeminate native body to epistemologically challenge the hegemonic hyper-masculinity advocated by both the regulatory mechanisms of the British Empire and a larger nationalist body culture in colonial India. The ingenious invention of a discursive intimacy between yoga and an aesthetics of demasculinization led to the strategic resignification of the male body in early Indian sculpture as both a sign and the site of an imagined national life. Through a close analysis of art writing and photography, art pedagogy and colonial archaeology, visual practices and sartorial cultures, my talk will delineate the fin-de-siècle politics and aesthetics of demasculinization that had led to the establishment of anti-colonial Indian art history’s disciplinary and methodological concerns.

     

    Kunstgeschichte und ästhetische Praktiken

    An Initiative of the Kunsthistorisches Institut Florenz, Max-Planck-Institut at the Forum Transregionale Studien, BerlinWallotstraße 14, 14193 Berlin

     

     

  • Andy Stewart to Speak About Nike of Samothrace in Paris

    Andy Stewart, Nicholas C. Petris Professor of Greek Studies and Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Art and Archaeology, has been invited as one of three guest speakers at the afternoon session of a public Study Day on the Nike (Winged Victory) of Samothrace at the Louvre, on March 28, 2015. Recently conserved and remounted, the Nike is among the most spectacular and most famous sculptures of ancient Greece. Joining him on the podium and for the subsequent debate - which promises to be lively - will be Professor François Queyrel of the École des Hautes Études in Paris and Professor Olga Palagia of the Department of Classical Archaeology at the University of Athens. 

  • Chris Hallett To Be Keynote Speaker at Florence Conference

    OUT OF SCALE!  Aesthetic, Technical, and Art Historical Perspectives on Ancient Bronze Statuary
    March 21, 2015
    Sala L’Altana Palazzo Strozzi Scuola Normale Superiore Firenze

     

    10:00 Registration

    10:15 Welcome

    MARIO CITRONI | Scuola Normale Superiore
    KENNETH LAPATIN | J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
    ANDREA PESSINA | Soprintendenza Toscana
    ARTURO GALANSINO | Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi
    LORENZO BINI SMAGHI | Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi

    11:00 Morning session

    Chair: GIANFRANCO ADORNATO | Scuola Normale Superiore

    Keynote speaker
    CHRISTOPHER HALLETT | University of California, Berkeley
    The Impact of Roman Collecting on Late Hellenistic Bronzes, Large and Small

    Discussant
    MICHAEL KOORTBOJIAN | Princeton University

    13:00 Lunch

    15:00 Afternoon session

    Chair: KENNETH LAPATIN | J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

    CAROL MATTUSCH | George Mason University, Virginia
    Piecing and Patching: the Dating of Ancient Bronzes

    KYOKO SENGOKU-HAGA | Tohoku University
    The Doryphoros Herm by Apollonios and the so-called Dancers of
    Herculaneum: Use of Plastice in Sculptors’ Workshops

    FABRIZIO PAOLUCCI | Galleria degli Uffizi, Firenze
    Divina et Praesentia Signa.
    Imperial Images in Precious Stones and Bronze

    17:15 Conclusions

     

    In occasion of the exhibitions

    Power and Pathos. Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World Firenze, Palazzo Strozzi | 14 March - 21 June 2015
    curated by Jens M. Daehner and Kenneth Lapatin

    Great Small Bronzes. Greek, Roman and Etruscan Masterpieces Firenze, Museo Archeologico Nazionale | 20 March - 21 June 2015 curated by Andrea Pessina, Mario Iozzo, Giuseppina C. Cianferoni

  • Digital Humanities Grants in History of Art

    Two projects in the Department of History of Art have received grants from the new Digital Humanities at Berkeley initiative.

    Professor Lisa Trever submitted a successful proposal to integrate digital components into her fall 2015 course "Mural Painting and the Ancient Americas." This seminar will explore the traditions of palace, temple, and tomb painting in ancient and pre-Hispanic Mexico, Guatemala, Peru, and the American Southwest, as well as modern and contemporary legacies of mural painting in Latin America and the United States. The Course Development Grant will allow the class to experiment with digital technologies for rendering digital models of ancient murals and for capturing site visits to murals in the Bay Area. This project is supported through the collaboration of digital curators and research specialists in the department's Visual Resources Center and the Archaeological Research Facility.

    In addition, Professor Elizabeth Honig and the VRC have received funds from the Digital Humanities initiative to create a repurposable platform that can be used to catalog the works of any visual artist. Built using Drupal, this platform will be made freely available to other scholars. This grant will be an extension of Dr. Honig’s project janbrueghel.net, which is also a collaboration with colleagues from the Duke University Math department and is funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Digital Humanities at Berkeley is a partnership between the Office of the Dean of Arts and Humanities and Research IT in the Office of the CIO. It is supported by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with additional support from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.

     


     

  • Beate Fricke Wins ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship

    Beate Fricke (Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley) and Barry Flood (Professor, New York University) have been awarded an ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship for 2016-17. The program provides support to small teams of two or more scholars to collaborate intensively on a single, substantive project. In Object Histories—Flotsam as Early Globalism, Beate Fricke and Barry Flood draw from case studies in the medieval European and Islamic worlds to tackle methodological and theoretical issues of writing histories of flotsam, when the only source one has is a unique surviving artifact, image, or monument divorced from other documentation of its contexts.

    Information about the ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship is here; read more about Professors Flood and Fricke's project here.

  • Sugata Ray Wins Islamic Visual Culture Essay Prize

    Sugata Ray has been awarded the Historians of Islamic Art Association's 2014-15 Margaret Ševčenko Prize for his essay Shangri La: The Archive-Museum and the Spatial Topologies of Islamic Art History. The Ševčenko Prize, awarded annually for the best essay written on any aspect of Islamic visual culture, is named in memory of Margaret Bentley Ševčenko, the first and long-serving Managing Editor of Muqarnas, a journal devoted to the visual culture of the Islamic world and sponsored by the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard and at MIT.

    Ray's essay on the twentieth-century display of Islamic art in the United States was researched during his 2013 tenure as Scholar-in-Residence at the Shangri La, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu. 

  • Lauren Kroiz Essay in Panorama's Debut "Bully Pulpit"

    The online journal of American art history Panorama features an essay by Lauren Kroiz in a new section that will pair short scholarly and polemical essays with brief responses from academics, curators, critics, and other interpreters of American art and visual culture. 

     

    The inaugural "Bully Pulpit" considers a historical question with significant implications for contemporary art history: how have American art historians defined and reconceived their discipline during past moments of severe economic, political, and institutional crisis? The academic status and disciplinary objectives of art history have of course inspired much discussion in recent years. Facing myriad new challenges—including the reorientation of higher education around scientific and technical inquiry, cutbacks in support for arts education, and the intertwined problems of widening income gaps and narrowing access to the fine arts—art historians have begun to question the means and ends of their field with a new intensity.
    The section’s lead essay, written by Lauren Kroiz, demonstrates that these crisis-fueled self-assessments have a deep history. Kroiz’s essay, “Parnassus Abolished,” examines the bold arguments for disciplinary reform that Iowa art historian Lester Longman made during his brief tenure as editor of the College Art Association periodical Parnassus (1940-41). As Longman was well aware, and as Kroiz explores, this exercise served as a mirror for bigger debates about American art and art history during the tumultuous interwar years. 

  • Julia Bryan-Wilson a Finalist for Writing Award

    Julia Bryan-Wilson has been named a finalist in the 2015 Absolut Art Writing Award, an international prize that recognizes exceptional achievement in art criticism. The previous (and inaugural) winner of this award was Coco Fusco.


     

  • Lisa Trever Wins Engaged Anthropology Grant

    Lisa Trever has received an Engaged Anthropology Grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation to return to Peru and organize a series of scholarly events and community-focused projects tied to her dissertation fieldwork. She writes about the experience here.

  • Department Faculty and Students to Speak at CAA

    Five members of the Department will present papers at the College Art Association's annual meetings in New York, February 11-14, 2015.  Please see the list of titles and abstracts here.