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  • Julia Bryan-Wilson honored with Faculty Award for Outstanding Mentoring of GSIs

    Prof. Julia Bryan-Wilson received the 2018 campus-wide award for her mentorship of graduate student instructors. This award recognizes contributions to teaching and learning, and is administered by the Graduate Council’s Advisory Committee for GSI Affairs and the Graduate Division’s GSI Teaching & Resource Center. 

  • Celebrating Graduate And Undergraduate Students 2017-2018

    Undergraduate Awards

    Tobias Rosen
    Honorable Mention from the Undergraduate Library Research Prize for his essay “Decapitating the Academie”

    Gabriella Wellons
    A paid summer internship in the Museum Voices program at the Princeton University Art Gallery

    Graduate Pre-doctoral Fellowships/Awards

    Sarah Louise Cowan
    Mellon-ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship
    Townsend Center for the Humanities Dissertation Fellowship

    Ramón de Santiago
    Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship for intensive study of Nahuatl at the University of Utah

    Thadeus Dowad
    CASVA’s three-year Paul Mellon Pre-Doctoral Fellowship
    Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship to complete an intensive Ottoman language program in Turkey

    Susan Eberhard
    CLIR Mellon Dissertation Fellowship
    Terra Foundation International Research travel grant
    New England Regional Fellowship Consortium (NERFC) grant

    Ellen Feiss
    Chester Dale fellowship, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art
    Smithsonian Institution Predoctoral Fellowship, Smithsonian American Art Museum (declined)
    Terra Foundation for American Art Summer Residency, Giverny, France
    Outstanding GSI Award

    Jessica (Jez) Flores García
    University of California Dissertation Year Fellowship for 2018–19

    Lesdi Goussen Robleto
    Tinker Foundation Field Research Grant

    Rebecca Levitan
    CAORC Traveling fellowship, 2018–2019, to research her dissertation on the "Pasquino" group
    Outstanding GSI Award

    Yessica Porras
    Mentored Research Award – a prize for students whose backgrounds, life experiences, and/or work contribute to diversity – for 2018–19

    Miriam Said
    CASVA’s Ittleson Fellowship to research her dissertation on Lamaštu and Pazuzu apotropaia in ancient Assyria

    Andrew Sears
    CASVA’s David E. Finley Fellowship

    Delphine Sims
    SFMOMA Curatorial Photography Internship, Summer 2018

    Shivani Sud
    Global Urban Humanities-Townsend Fellowship
    American Institute of Indian Studies Junior Research Fellowship
    Fulbright-Nehru Student Research Award
    Social Science and Research Council International Dissertation Research Fellowship 

    Graduate Postdoctoral Fellowships/Awards

    Grace Harpster
    Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship, Columbia University, Department of Art History & Archaeology

    Elaine Yau
    NEH Summer Research Grant

    Job Placements

    Grace Harpster
    Tenure Track Position, Georgia State University

    Rosaline Kyo
    Assistant Professor of Asian Art and Chinese Studies at Davidson College in North Carolina

    Laure Marest-Caffey
    Cornelius and Emily Vermeule Assistant Curator of Greek and Roman Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

    Kappy Mintie
    2-year Visiting Assistant Professor of American Art at DePauw University

    Emma Silverman
    2-Year Visiting Assistant Professor of American Art and Architecture at Smith College

    Jennifer Stager
    Assistant Professor of Greek and Roman Art at Johns Hopkins University

     

  • Julia Bryan-Wilson Awarded NEH Summer Stipend

    Prof. Julia Bryan-Wilson was awarded a competitive grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for her book project, under advanced contract with Yale University Press, on sculptor Louise Nevelson.

    More of the grantees are found here.

  • ARLIS/NA Honors Kathryn Wayne with 2017 Distinguished Service Award

    The Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) is pleased to announce Kathryn Wayne as the recipient of the 2017 Distinguished Service Award. She is the 27th person to receive the Society’s highest honor. The Distinguished Service Award honors an individual whose exemplary service in art librarianship, visual resources curatorship, or a related field has made an outstanding national or international contribution to art information. Kathryn’s deep and far-reaching contributions to the Society and to the field of art librarianship perfectly embody the accomplishments most valued by the Society.

    The award was presented to Kathryn by her nominator, Gregory P. J. Most, at ARLIS/NA’s 46th annual conference convocation ceremony, held in New York City on Wednesday, February 28, 2018. Gregory is Chief of the Image Collections at the National Gallery of Art.

    Kathryn recently retired as head of the Art History/Classics Library at the University of California, Berkeley. She came to UC Berkeley in 1990 as Architecture and Landscape Architecture Librarian at Berkeley’s Environmental Design Library following many years as Architecture Librarian at the University of Arizona.

    Throughout her career Kathryn has taken on leadership positions within the Society. In her role as 27th President of ARLIS/NA, she oversaw the transition to a new management firm, while also pursuing a very public role in advocacy. She initiated letters to Congress backing policies that affected copyright and database legislation; wrote to the Getty Information Institute concerning the importance of continuing the Getty Vocabulary Program; addressed then-Mayor Rudolph Giuliani concerning ARLIS/NA’s stand on the controversial Brooklyn Museum of Art exhibition, Sensation, and corresponded with the President of the National Architectural Accrediting Board concerning recommendations for changing its standards for architecture libraries, many of which were adopted. In addition to serving as president of the national organization, she also served as Western Regional Representative and Chapter Chair for both the Arizona and Northern California Chapters.

    Kathryn co-chaired the national conference in 1993, and this work served to inform one of Kathryn’s enduring legacies to the Society. Her fundraising for the 2013 Pasadena and 2014 Washington D.C. conferences yielded record amounts. She has a special ability to persuade individuals, companies, and organizations to generously support the mission of the Society. Her triumphs as a fundraiser made these conferences financially successful beyond all expectations.

    Two of her notable publications are the seminal reference book Architecture Sourcebook: A Guide to Resources on the Practice of Architecture published by Omnigraphics in 1997, and her contribution to the 33-volume Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences published by CRC Press in 2010, for which she wrote the chapter on Art Librarianship.

    Despite these impressive professional accomplishments, Kathryn never lost sight of the fundamental role of librarianship at her home institutions. Her dedication to students endured throughout her career. She established an information literacy program at the University of California, Berkeley School of Environmental Design and shared her experience through a subsequent professional presentation on the program. She mentored San Jose State library school students and University of California undergraduate students. One former student wrote, “Kathryn has not only enriched the profession, she has shaped my life.”

    For her contributions to the field at large and to ARLIS/NA in particular, Kathryn Wayne has been awarded the 2017 Distinguished Service Award.

    The members of the 2017 ARLIS/NA Distinguished Service Award Sub-Committee were: Rachel Resnik (chair), Maureen Burns, Heather Koopmans, Maria Oldal, and Liv Valmestad.

    About the Art Libraries Society of North America
    Founded in 1972, the Art Libraries Society of North America is a dynamic, international organization of more than 1,000 individuals devoted to fostering excellence in art and design librarianship and image management in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The membership includes architecture and art librarians, visual resources professionals, artists, curators, educators, publishers, students, and others interested in visual arts information. To serve this diverse constituency, the Society provides a wide range of programs and services within an organizational structure that encourages participation at all levels.

    For more information visit www.arlisna.org 

  • Clark Art Institute honors Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby with Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing

    Scholar and writer Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby has been selected to receive the Clark Art Institute’s 2017 Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing. Grigsby is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professor in the Arts and Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley. The award presentation will take place on Saturday, April 7, 2018 during an event at the Milton Resnick and Pat Passloff Foundation in New York City.

    “The Clark Prize raises awareness of the importance of writing that bridges scholarly and popular interest in the arts and seeks to encourage support for such writing among publishers, editors, and the public,” said Olivier Meslay, the Felda and Dena Hardymon Director of the Clark. “Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby’s writing is deeply rooted in serious academic tradition, but easily connects to the public through compelling prose and thoughtful analysis. We are delighted to recognize her work with the Clark Prize.”

    Grigsby, who was born in the Panama Canal Zone, focuses her scholarship onthe history of art and material culture in France and the United States from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century, especially in relation to colonialism, slavery, and constructions of race. She writes on painting, sculpture, photography, and engineering, as well as the relationships among reproductive media and new technologies.

    “I am deeply honored to be awarded the Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing,” Grigsby said, “especially because my own priorities as a scholar and teacher so closely match its mission to honor ‘accessible prose that advances public understanding’ and ‘appeal[s] to a diverse range of audiences.’ What an admirable, generous, and profoundly political goal.

    “As the daughter of a Panamanian immigrant, a single mother who was hard-working, financially strapped, courageous, accented, and brown,” she explained, “I long hesitated even to aspire to speak about art―an act that I perceived to be the prerogative of a white and typically male elite. How exclusionary can the heady mix of art and money feel to those who are not privileged! In response, my scholarship has been motivated by a commitment to equity, social justice, and the histories of overlooked and disenfranchised persons; thus my focus on slavery, empire, and revolution; thus my need not only to reexamine the canonical, but to analyze other kinds of neglected objects. As an educator at a public university under siege for lack of funding, the very university that introduced me to the field of art history, I attempt to enfranchise students, to empower them to question, resist, and find solace in art, to be curious about history, and to respect difference. Finally, I ask my students to analyze how the visual achieves what words do not, and―here is the kicker―to do so in writing. Art history’s paradox: finding words for what we see, the simplest, most elusive, and challenging of goals.”

    Michael Ann Holly, Starr Director Emeritus of the Clark’s Research and Academic Program, led the 2017 jury for the Clark Prize. Other members of the panel included 2006 Clark Prize recipient Kobena Mercer, a scholar and critic, and David Breslin, the DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

    “Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby has given us new, yet historically grounded, readings of canonical works of art and artists,” said Holly. “As such she is the first Clark Prize awardee in a few years who is an art historian rather than a scholar of modern and contemporary art. A versatile and graceful writer, she has published stunning essays on nineteenth-century figures ranging from the former slave Sojourner Truth to the influential French painter Théodore Géricault, among many others. Versed in interpretative modes of visual culture, such as postcolonial theory, psychoanalysis, and feminism, her writing is rich in historical detail with contemporary implications.”

    Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby's bio

    About the Clark Prize
    The Clark Prize is funded by the Beinecke Family through the Prospect Hill Foundation. It is accompanied by a $25,000 honorarium and an award designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Tadao Ando, the designer of two buildings on the Clark’s Williamstown campus.

    The inaugural Clark Prize was awarded in 2006 to three individuals: Kobena Mercer, a writer and critic; Linda Nochlin, an art historian and leader in feminist art history studies; and Calvin Tomkins, author and art critic for The New Yorker magazine. In 2008 Peter Schjeldahl, the esteemed art critic for The New Yorker magazine received the prize, followed by art critic and Princeton University professor Hal Foster in 2010; artist, writer, and critic Brian O’Doherty in 2012; and poet and writer Eileen Myles in 2015.

    Members of the Clark Prize jury were chosen for their long-standing commitment to the arts and their expertise in the field. Jurors serve as both nominators and judges. Individuals engaged in all forms of arts writing, including criticism, commentary, monographs, catalogue essays, and biography, are eligible for nomination.

    For more information about the award event in New York, please call 413-458-0524.  

  • Commencement 2018

    History of Art Commencement exercises will take place on Tuesday, May 15th at 9:00 a.m. in the auditorium at BAMPFA. Save the date!

    This year's commencement speaker is Dominic Willsdon, Leanne and George Roberts Curator of Education and Public Programs at SFMOMA.

  • Faculty publications named "best art books of the year" by the New York Times

    Professor Julia Bryan-Wilson's new book Fray: Art and Textile Politics was selected by Holland Cotter as one of the "best art books of 2017" in the New York Times.  Assistant Professors Atreyee Gupta and Anneka Lenssen both contributed to another publication on the list, Postwar: Art Between the Pacific and the Atlantic, 1945-1965  (Haus der Kunst). 
     
    "Textile art, sometimes called fiber art, once occupied ambiguous terrain in a now-obsolete art vs. craft divide. Julia Bryan-Wilson’s book goes beyond arguing for fiber’s aesthetic legitimacy to demonstrating its political agency. And she does so by considering an enthralling range of hitherto untapped material: fantastic costumes designed by the 1970s queer theater troupe, the Cockettes; hand-sewn tapestries produced by Chilean artists depicting torture under the Pinochet regime; and the still-growing NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt. Ms. Bryan-Wilson’s research is more than substantial, but her propulsive style makes the book a page-turner."

     

  • History of Art BA Ryan Serpa Featured in L&S News

    From the Letters and Science site:

    "For art history major Ryan Serpa '17, color is everything.

    "While researching pioneering figurative artist David Park for his thesis, nothing has been more powerful — or accurate — than viewing Park's work in person. Serpa received a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, funded by private donors, that enabled him to get an up-close read on the paintings in museums and archives, including the Smithsonian.

    "'I never would have had the funds to travel, nor the time to dedicate to the work, without this opportunity,' says Serpa. Bay Area figurative art arose in the 1950s during a period of rapid development and changing demographics, particularly an influx of black migrants. Serpa proposes that Park used color to subtly suggest race, while also eluding outright reference to it — impossible, considering the segregation laws at the time. To Serpa's knowledge, he is the first person to pinpoint this potential thread of inquiry, an extraordinary accomplishment for an undergraduate."

  • Young Scholars Research Symposium: A celebration of student excellence

    On Tuesday, May 2nd, History of Art undergraduate Ariana Pemberton will present her honors thesis "Geography, Identity, and Monumentality: Global Cosmopolitanisms and the Martand Sun Temple in Kashmir" at the ​​Young Scholars Research Symposium: A celebration of student excellence​​ organized by the South Asia Institute.

    For more details: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/csas.html?event_ID=106094