TAG CLOUD

Aaron Hyman Acknowledgments aesthetics Alan Tansman Aleksandr Rossman Alexandra Courtois American art Ancient art Andrew Griebeler Andrew Sears Andrew Stewart Anne Wagner Anneka Lenssen anthropology archaeology archives art criticism Art Practice Asian art astrolabes Atreyee Gupta Australian Academy of the Humanities award awards BAMPFA Bancroft Library Beate Fricke Berkeley Art Museum Bonnie Wade British art bronze statuary Byzantium Caravaggio CASVA Catherine Telfair Chair Charles O'Donnell chartalism Chinese art Chinese art history Chinese painting Chris Hallett Christopher Bollas College Art Association Commencement conference Contemporary Art courses Courtauld Institute curatorial preparedness Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby De Young Museum digital humanities Diliana Angelova DIstinguished Teacher of Art History Distinguished Teaching Award Dutch art Dutch Studies early globalism Early Modern Ecohistory ecological history economics Elaine Yau Elizabeth McFadden Emma Silverman Endowed Chair faculty faculty recruitment fellowships Finbarr Barry Flood Florence folklore Frederick Douglass Freie Universität Fulbright Gabriella Wellons George Lurcy Fellowship Gerhard Wolf Glenn Adamson global art global modern art Grace Harpster graduate graduate student instructor awards Graduate Student Instructors graduate student support graduate students Graduation Greek art Hearst Museum Hellenistic art history of science honors Imogen Hart India Indian Art Islamic art Ittleson Fellowship James Cahill Jason Hosford Jessica Flores Jessy Bell Jordan Rose Jordan Ross Julia Bryan-Wilson Justin Underhill Kailani Polzak Kappy Mintie Katherine Mintie Kathryn Wayne King's College London Kunsthistorisches Institut L. S. Lowry Latin American art history Laure Marest-Caffey Lauren Kroiz librarians Lisa Trever Louvre major Manet Margaretta Lovell material culture Matilde Andrews Medieval Art Mellon Fellowship Mellon Foundation Methods Micki McCoy Miriam Said modern art money Monuments Men museum New York Nike of Samothrace object-based learning object-oriented histories Oxford University Panorama Patricia Berger Peru Peter Selz photography Post-Culturalist Pre-Columbian psychoanalysis publications Ramon de Santiago Reading and Composition Renaissance Rumble Lecture Ryan Serpa San Francisco Sarah Cowan sculpture slavery Smithsonian Sojourner Truth South Asia staff Stephanie Pearson Stoddard Lecture Sugata Ray summer sessions T.J. Clark Tate Britain teaching team-teaching Theory Todd Olson Townsend Center undergraduate undergraduates Verenice Ramirez Visual Resources Center VRA VRC Wenner Gren Foundation Whitney Davis Will Coleman William Ma Wyeth Foundation Yanis Varoufakis
News RSS from UC Berkeley Art History Dept

About Us

News

  • Exhibition on cinemas of India and Senegal at the Doe Library co-curated by Sugata Ray and Ivy Mills

     

    Exhibition on cinemas of India and Senegal at the Doe Library co-curated by Sugata Ray and Ivy Mills

    Love across the Global South: Popular Cinema Cultures of India and Senegal
    Exhibition at the Bernice L. Brown Gallery, Doe Library, University of California, Berkeley October 6, 2017–March 1, 2018

    Opening Reception, October 6 | 5-7 p.m. | Morrison Library (101 Doe Library)

    5:00-5:30: Viewing of the exhibition
    5:30-5:45: Sugata Ray, Exhibition Co-curator: "Fields of Desire: Afro-Asian Networks and the Making of an Indian Ocean Art History"
    5:45-6: Ivy Mills, Exhibition Co-curator: "Indo-Senegalese Cultural Formations: Curating Love across the Global South"
    6-6:15: Liladhar Pendse, Exhibition Co-Curator: “Movies from the Muhallā: Imagining the Global South through Bollywood” 
    6:15-6:30: South-Asian Acapella Performance by Berkeley's Dil Se 

    Love across the Global South explores interconnections between South Asian and African popular cultures through film posters, footage, and memorabilia. Focusing on the circulation of Bombay cinema, South Asia’s largest film industry, in Senegal, West Africa, the exhibition foregrounds the role of transnational film cultures and fan clubs in shaping affinities across the Global South. Highlighting archival material held by UC Berkeley—including a collection of twentieth-century popular film magazines and films housed at the Media Resources Center—the exhibition harnesses library holdings to nuance campus debates on race, globalization, and visual representation while experimenting with new curatorial practices that emphasize Afro-Asian connections in an expanded Indian Ocean imaginary. The exhibition is curated by Sugata Ray (Assistant Professor, History of Art), Ivy Mills (Lecturer, History of Art), Liladhar Pendse (Librarian, Central Asian and Eastern European Studies), and Adnan Malik (Curator for South Asian Collections, South/Southeast Asia Library). The Mellon Curatorial Preparedness Initiative funded Curatorial Assistantships for History of Art Department graduate students Shivani Sud and Randip Bakshi.

  • History of Art BA Ryan Serpa Featured in L&S News

    From the Letters and Science site:

    "For art history major Ryan Serpa '17, color is everything.

    "While researching pioneering figurative artist David Park for his thesis, nothing has been more powerful — or accurate — than viewing Park's work in person. Serpa received a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, funded by private donors, that enabled him to get an up-close read on the paintings in museums and archives, including the Smithsonian.

    "'I never would have had the funds to travel, nor the time to dedicate to the work, without this opportunity,' says Serpa. Bay Area figurative art arose in the 1950s during a period of rapid development and changing demographics, particularly an influx of black migrants. Serpa proposes that Park used color to subtly suggest race, while also eluding outright reference to it — impossible, considering the segregation laws at the time. To Serpa's knowledge, he is the first person to pinpoint this potential thread of inquiry, an extraordinary accomplishment for an undergraduate."

  • Young Scholars Research Symposium: A celebration of student excellence

    On Tuesday, May 2nd, History of Art undergraduate Ariana Pemberton will present her honors thesis "Geography, Identity, and Monumentality: Global Cosmopolitanisms and the Martand Sun Temple in Kashmir" at the ​​Young Scholars Research Symposium: A celebration of student excellence​​ organized by the South Asia Institute.

    For more details: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/csas.html?event_ID=106094

     

  • New Faculty Member Atreyee Gupta Joining History of Art in Fall 2017

    Assistant Professor Atryee Gupta will be joining the UC Berkeley History of Art Department faculty in the fall semester of 2017, and her first class here will be HA36: Asia Modern: Art + Architecture, 1800-present, offered Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:30-11am. Dr. Gupta's area of specialization is global modernisms and contemporary art, with a special emphasis on South and Southeast Asia and its diaspora. Her research and teaching interests cluster around visual and intellectual histories of twentieth-century art; the intersections between the Cold War, the Non-Aligned Movement, and art after 1945; new media and experimental cinema; and the question of the global more broadly. A more detailed look at her areas of specialization, a link to her full CV, and a list of her publications can be found at her faculty page.

  • Return of Ten Thousand Dharmas: A Celebration in Honor of Patricia Berger

    Please join us for "Return of Ten Thousand Dharmas: A Celebration in Honor of Patricia Berger" on May 5–6, 2017.

    Patricia Berger served as the curator of Chinese art at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco from 1982 to 1994. She then returned to her alma mater to mentor another generation of graduate students as Professor of Chinese Art at the University of California at Berkeley. In celebration of her well-deserved retirement, we invite you to join her current and former students and colleagues to honor her contributions to the field. Professor Berger will deliver a keynote lecture on Friday, May 5 at the David Brower Center, followed by a one-day symposium on Saturday, May 6, 2017 in the Heyns Room at the Faculty Club. This event is free and open to the public.

    The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Department of History of Art, Institute of East Asian Studies, and Mongolia Initiative.

    For more information, please visit Return of Ten Thousand Dharmas: A Celebration in Honor of Patricia Berger, or if you have further questions, contact tenthousanddharmas@berkeley.edu.

  • History of Art Students Win Merit Scholarships

    Three students in History of Art have been awarded Undergraduate Merit Scholarships from the Institute of International Studies. These scholarships support undergraduate research in any area of international studies. Winners come from twenty-two different academic departments and six colleges and school.

    History of Art scholarship winners for Spring 2017 are:

    Ariana Pemberton
    The Sun Temple of Martand: the Pinnacle of Kashmiri Cosmopolitanism and the Key to Surya Worship in India

    Haili Wang
    Crafting “Worker’s Art”: Migrant Labor, Collective Authorship, and Artist Village in Post-Mao China

    Gabriella Wellons
    A Contextual Approach to Ancient “Graffiti”: Pictorial Codes and Motifs in Moche Religious Wall Paintings at Huacas de Moche

    Congratulations!

    http://iis.berkeley.edu/node/419/155
     

  • Julia Bryan-Wilson Contributes to Award-Winning Volume

    Lawrence Alloway: Critic and Curator (Getty Research Institute), which includes Julia Bryan-Wilson's contribution "The Present Complex: Lawrence Alloway and the Currency of Museums," received the Historians of British Art Book Award for best multi-authored work in 2015.

    The award citation reads:

    Lucy Bradnock, Courtney J. Martin, and Rebecca Peabody, eds., Lawrence Alloway: Critic and Curator, Getty Research Institute.

    Lawrence Alloway (1926–1990) was a key figure in the development of modern art in Europe and America from the 1950s to the 1980s. He is credited with coining the term pop art and with championing conceptual art and feminist artists in America. His interests as a critic and as a curator at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York were wide-ranging, however, and included architecture, design, earthworks, film, neorealism, science fiction, and public sculpture. Early in his career he was associated with the Independent Group in London and although he was largely self-taught, he was a noted educator and lecturer. A prolific writer, Alloway sought to escape the conventions of art-historical discourse. This volume illuminates how he often shaped the field and anticipated approaches such as social art history and visual and cultural studies. Lawrence Alloway: Critic and Curator provides the first critical analysis of the multiple facets of Alloway’s life and career, exploring his formative influence on the disciplines of art history, art criticism, and museum studies. The nine essays in this volume depend on primary archival research, much of it conducted in the Lawrence Alloway Papers held by the Getty Research Institute. Each author addresses a distinct aspect of Alloway’s eclectic professional interests and endeavors.

  • Lauren Kroiz Wins CAA Publication Prize

    Assistant Professor Lauren Kroiz received a Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant from the College Art Association for her book Cultivating Citizens: The Regional Work of Art in the New Deal Era. Thanks to a generous grant from the Wyeth Foundation, these awards are given annually to publishers to support the publication of one or more book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies, and related subjects. For this grant program, “American art” is defined as art created in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

  • Equity Advisors Host Campus Affirmation Rally

    On Thursday, November 10, Faculty Equity Advisors across campus hosted an "informal rally to affirm support for a diverse, inclusive, and equitable campus community, and for the extension of these values to our society at large."

     "We want each and every member of our campus community to know that they are valued and have allies and advocates in every Department and
    College.

    It is important to provide the opportunity for our campus members to participate in a positive action that shows solidarity and strength in numbers. This complements other more focused efforts on campus including the creation of safe spaces and opportunities for dialogue."